Hand Injury Compensation Claims & Settlement Values

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A claim for hand injury compensation can be made if the injury was caused through the negligent actions of another party, such as an employer or other organisation. To succeed with a claim it is important that medical treatment is sought in order that the severity of the injury and details of any ongoing loss of dexterity and strength within the hand are on record.

Hand injury compensation settlement values will vary depending on the severity of the injury and take in to account level of recovery, cosmetic factors such as scarring and the level of pain and suffering.

Whether your hand injury was sustained in an accident at work, a fall in a public place or in a road traffic accident, we know your rights and can ensure your claim will have the best prospects of succeeding.

Table of contents:

Types of hand injury that can form a claim

Our specialist personal injury solicitors can pursue a claim for any hand injury that is of a certain severity, as long as the injury was caused by the negligent actions of someone else.

The most common types of hand injury that lead to clients instructing us to make a no win no fee claim are:

  • Bone breaks, fractures and crushing injuries. The hand is a vital part of daily life for any person and bone injuries can be extremely painful, leading to diminished dexterity and reduced independence. The injured person is unlikely to be able to drive temporarily and will struggle to work as normal if they have to use tools or operate a keyboard.
  • Soft tissue hand injuries such as ligament sprains and strains, tendon damage, muscle tears and contusions. Grip strength and fine movements of the hand are governed by the soft tissues and damage to these can greatly restrict dexterity and prevent full use of the hand until a full recovery is made.
  • Lacerations to the hand – cuts to the fingers or hand can lead to nerve damage and scarring that can reduce sensation and impair grip strength. When nerve damage is caused, the loss of sensation can greatly affect the ability to perform even the most basic tasks.
  • Dermatitis
  • Vibration White Finger
  • Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Evidence and liability to succeed

To succeed with a claim for hand injury compensation it is vital that a specialist solicitor is able to identify the correct evidence to support the claim. It must be demonstrated that the injury was avoidable and was only caused because of the negligent acts of an employer, an organisation or a 3rd party such as a motorist.

Road traffic accidents

In road traffic accidents, a hand injury is often sustained if a rider is thrown from a bicycle or motorbike, or by impacting on a steering wheel in a car. In such cases, the details of the other driver responsible for the accident will be needed as it is their insurers who will face a claim. In cases where the identity of the other driver are unknown or they were uninsured, our specialist solicitors can pursue a claim for compensation via the Motor Insurers Bureau schemes.

Accidents in public

For hand injuries sustained as a result of a fall in a public place or a slip on a wet floor, the owner of the land or company responsible for the maintenance of the accident site could be liable. In such cases it is important to make sure that the accident details are reported with the cause of any trip or slip noted in an accident book.

Work accidents

If you suffer a hand injury at work, you could make a claim against your employer. Any person involved in an accident at work, whether using machinery without adequate training or after a fall from height, should make sure that an accident book entry is completed. The negligence that lead to the hand injury – such as a lack of training or using a broken machine should be included on any record of the accident.

If you haven’t been able to record your injury in an accident book, or your employer won’t let you, don’t worry, we can help.

Medical evidence is very important when it comes to making a claim for hand injury compensation and your medical records will form the basis of your claim. Your solicitor can arrange for you to see a hand injury specialist who will write a detailed report about the severity of your injury to use as evidence.

Hand injury compensation amounts

The full value of a claim for hand injury compensation will only be known once relevant medical evidence is obtained and an understanding of the injury length or amount of recovery is reached.

We’ll arrange for a hand injury specialist to assess your injury and review your medical records. Our specialist solicitors will make sure that your hand injury claim settlement value is maximised by taking in to account:

  • Length of time of your pain and suffering
  • Medical costs
  • How your hand injury affects your day-to-day personal activities and sporting interests
  • Loss of income and personal expenses caused by the hand injury
  • Scarring and level of recovery

If your hand injury is ongoing and of a serious nature preventing you from being able to work, our solicitors will seek an interim settlement to help you cope with a loss of income.

The amounts below are for the injury itself, but you can also claim for special damages which would include your expenses and rehabilitation therapies, for example.

Total or effective loss of both hands

For serious injury resulting in extensive damage to both hands so that they are rendered little more than useless, compensation amounts range between around £100,000 and £170,000.

Serious damage to both hands

This covers injuries that have given rise to permanent cosmetic disability and significant loss of function. Here, settlement values fall between £40,000 and £70,000

Total or effective loss of one hand

This would apply to a hand which was crushed and then surgically amputated, or where all fingers and most of the palm have been amputated. If it is the dominant hand, values will be higher. They range between £70,000 and £90,000.

Amputation of index and middle and/or ring fingers

Here the hand will have rendered of very little use and grip will be exceedingly weak. Compensation amounts tend to fall between £45,000 and £75,000.

Serious hand injuries

Where use of the hand is reduced by around 50%, for example if several fingers have been amputated but rejoined to the hand leaving unsightly appearance and a reduction of grip and dexterity, values range between £20,000 and £50,000.

Less serious hand injuries

For example, a severely crushed hand that is left with significantly impaired function can expect compensation of between £10,000 and £25,000.

Moderate hand injury

This covers crush injuries, penetrating wounds, soft tissue damage and deep lacerations. Here, amounts range between around £4,000 and £11,000 depending on severity.

Minor hand injuries

Less serious than the above, with recovery within a few months, minor hand injuries attract values of between £700 and £4,000.

Severe fractures to fingers

These may lead to partial amputations and result in deformity, impairment of grip, reduced mechanical function and disturbed sensation. Compensation amounts can be up to £30,000.

Total loss of index finger

£14,000 – £16,000

Partial loss of index finger

£9,000 – £16,000

Fracture of index finger

£7,000 – £10,000

Total loss of middle finger

£11,000 – £13,000

Serious injury to ring or middle fingers

£11,000 – £14,000

Loss of the tip of a ring or middle finger

£3,000 – £7,000

Amputation of a little finger

£6,000 – £10,000

Loss of part of a little finger

£3,000 – £5,000

Amputation of ring and little fingers

£16,000 – £18,000

Fracture of one finger

Up to £3,600, depending on recovery time.

Loss of thumb

£27,000 – £46,000

Very serious injury to the thumb

This would include where the thumb has been severed at the base and grafted back on, but leaving a virtually useless and deformed digit, or a partial amputation. Amounts here range between £15,000 and £30,000.

Serious injury to the thumb

For example, amputation of the tip, nerve damage or fracture requiring the insertion of wires, as a result of which the thumb is cold and ultra-sensitive and there is impaired grip and dexterity. Compensation here would fall between £9,000 and £15,000.

Moderate injuries to the thumb

This covers injuries which result in impairment of sensation and function, and cosmetic deformity. Possibly through damage to nerves and tendons. Settlement values range from £7,000 to £11,000.

Minor injuries to the thumb

For example, a fracture which recovers within six months but leaves stiffness and discomfort, could be awarded up to £3,000.

Trivial thumb injuries

These may have caused severe pain for a very short time but recovered within a few months, attracting settlement values of up to £2,000.

How can I start my claim?

If you have suffered a hand injury within the last 3 years and believe it was caused by the negligent actions of another, a broken pavement surface or other hazard in a public environment, you can start a claim for hand injury compensation today.

Our expert friendly staff know your rights and will quickly help you to identify the right course of action. You can start your claim online and we’ll call you to explain the claims process, answer any questions you may have and get the ball rolling. Alternatively, request a call back and one of our expert team will be in touch to offer help, or simply call us on 01225 430285.

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Questions & Answers


  1. John

    Hi, I injured my hand at work 2 months ago and I was seen to by a first aider but nothing was logged. I have still got problems with my hand so went to the doctors and they want me to get an x-ray and physio. Because I haven’t logged it in the accident book, am I too late? I would like work to help with private physio.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The issue you have is proving that the injury you are suffering with now, was caused at work in the accident you mention. Do you have any witnesses to the accident? Was anything noted to any colleagues in an email or text message for example?

      Reply
  2. Robin

    I was injured on a residential only shelter property. I fell backwards off an unstable front porch and had to have surgery on my hand due to lacerations. the accident occurred on December 8th and I have tried to ask for a copy of the incident report to ensure that this was filed with them on the owners insurance. now my insurance carrier is asking about third party liability and in the landlord’s unwilling to give me insurance information of documentation of the fall. Do I have a personal injury claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you believe that your injury was avoidable if proper attention had been paid to an area in need of repair or maintenance, but was not provided, you can pursue a claim for personal injury compensation.

      Reply
  3. ann marie

    My hand got injured on the job three years ago. I reported the matter to the office but they claim they cannot find my written complaint. I don’t have any medical records to show. But now i have difficulty using my hand, i’m still working with the company. How can i get compensated for my injuries?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      UK law requires any claimant to make their claim for personal injury compensation within 3 years of the date of the accident in which they were injured. As your hand was injured 3 years ago, you are now barred from taking action by law and we cannot therefore assist you.

      Reply
  4. Moesha

    Im a bartender and handle glass frequently at work, I have to empty the bottle bins and always accidentally cut myself every shift – yet my boss has never done accident forms for them.

    The other day I actually cut myself badly for the first time at work, my boss finally did an accident form but said my hands fine. She even said this is why we wear gloves (yet I told her ages ago I don’t know where any are, she said behind the bar somewhere, which wasn’t helpful). I went a&e got medical glue on it, my hand started bleeding again and the hospital said I should of had stitches. I’m now unable to work until it heals and don’t get sick pay. I also dance and worry it’s going to affect that.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer has effectively admitted negligence in saying that they have gloves for such work, but not provided you with them or even shown you where to get them. The accident report completion is good evidence, but you would be wise to put in writing the comment about the gloves and that all you have been told is that they are ‘behind the bar somewhere’.

      By making a claim against the employer for the laceration injury, you will (if successful) be able to recover your lost income or other expenses as well as compensation for the injury itself. Our Solicitors would be very happy to discuss your situation in detail with you to offer qualified advice and if deemed appropriate, act for you – should you wish to instruct them.

      To find out more about making a claim for compensation and to further understand the No Win No Fee system and what that really means, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  5. Kylie

    My husband injured his hand and required surgery (pin insertion) all done through work cover. 15 years on he is now getting terrible pain and swelling possibly needing further surgery to remove pins, is this in any way covered by work cover?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Within the legal system of the United Kingdom, any obligations your Husband’s employer had with regard to medical treatment or compensation liabilities after his accident at work would expire after 3 years from the date of the accident. Therefore, in this situation, he would have to pursue any medical treatment via the National Health Service where he would not pay for treatment.

      Reply
  6. Georgia

    I was hired by B. n M to work as a sales assistant a week ago. 30 of us had a 2 day induction we spent 20mins covering manual handling and health and safety. We were told we would be helping to “build the shop” as it was an empty shell. First day 8 hours of constructing interior walls/shelving units 2nd day the same . Extreme bruising up arms and hands several workers cut themselves and bleeding. I have photographed my arms. I asked the manager if we could have gloves she stated no. We were not told to protect our hands or arms. 3rd day unloading heavy pallets on top of bruised arms 4th day back to building shelving/walls. My arms are in absolute agony. I am attending the G.P to check my arms. Is this legal ? We had no training, i am black and blue.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should make a report of your injuries in writing to the employer. Ideally, you should complete an accident book entry – but if that isn’t possible, email your employer. The lack of gloves or guidance with regards to the construction of the shelving etc would indicate that you may succeed with a claim for compensation for the injuries sustained.

      When you have seen your GP and been given a diagnosis, you should contact us to start your claim.

      Reply
  7. Jackie

    HGV driver. I got my hand crushed between my car door and a HGV 2018. I was on full wages for 3 months then returned to work. I had yet another incident 2 months ago. I have a torn biceps tendon. The medics also found I had an old fracture of the shoulder. I am still awaiting a hospital appointment I believe the two incidents are connected although these are different.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If your injuries were caused through the negligence of another party, you can make a claim for compensation against whoever was responsible for your injuries.

      You could have two claims – the damage to your hand and also the torn bicep injury. If you would like to discuss making a claim with us and tell us more about your injuries and how they happened, we’ll be able to advise you further. You can start the process with us online.

      Reply
  8. Suzanne

    A couple of years back our company changed out our cell phones for a much larger heavier Samsung. From the beginning I knew I was going to have difficulty with it due to the size and weight. I am a petite female and this phone with the case they require you to have my hands barely fit around. I brought this to the attention of my immediate supervisor and was told there is no other option. Side note: another employee was given a smaller device just for asking. Several months went by and my hands continued to decline. It took me going to a hand specialist and producing documentation that I am now at the point of needing surgery on both hands. I was then finally given a smaller phone. Around the same time another employee said they did not like this phone and refused to use it and was granted the smaller phone with no documentation. Is this legal? I now have to undergo two surgeries and will be out with cut pay. I would appreciate some insight on this. Thank you. Ps I’ve been a valued employee there for 16 years

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The phones that you were tasked with using are likely to be found to be safe for use and not of a weight that would be considered to he a hazard to use. That said, there is no obvious reason for the employer to fail to consider providing you with an alternative handset.

      Reply
  9. Chase

    What happens if I don’t get hurt at work but I’m outta work for weeks with a broken hand is there anything I can do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you are injured away from your workplace and that injury prevents you from working, your employer is not liable and under UK law would have no legal obligation to pay your usual salary unless you were contractually entitled to full pay whilst off sick. It is most likely that you are only legally entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) and the employer must pay you that.

      The only course of action you would have regarding recovery of any loss of income or compensation would be by claiming against the cause of the broken hand. Therefore if you fell somewhere or were injured in a road traffic accident for example, you could pursue a claim against the relevant person or authority and if successful recover your loss of income etc from them.

      If you need some further help with this, please do call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  10. Bonani

    I got a spiral fracture in the fourth metacarpal of the right hand. I was on my way home from work and I didn’t think it was anything so serious as it happened Thursday of the Easter weekend, but I only knew on the Saturday after I’d gone to the GP and been sent for an x-ray, so I called my manager on Sunday to tell him about my accident. I want to know do I have to claim or not?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you have a valid claim for accident at work compensation for the spiral fracture to your hand will not depend on when you reported the severity of the injury to your employer, but on what exactly caused your hand to be injured.

      If you were injured due to faulty equipment, inadequate personal protective equipment, a lack of training or some other element of employer negligence you will have a valid claim.

      It would be sensible for you to call our team on 01225430285. Our staff are specially trained and have expert knowledge regarding your rights after an injury suffered in an accident at work and will be able to help you identify whether or not you can pursue a claim for compensation.

      Reply
  11. WILLIAM

    I just moved to a material handler position and was training on a Raymond 8410 powered pallet mover This unit has a motorcycle type throttle in back, with no guard protecting the hand. This resulted in me receiving a crushing hand injury. No fractures, or ligament damage, but severe bruising and swelling, with sixteen stitches required. is this worth pursuing? My medical expenses are being taken care of, and I am on light duty at work.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The lack of a guard to protect the hand of users on this machine could well mean that a valid claim for compensation could be made. We would like to investigate this further for you.

      Reply
  12. Donna

    My partner class 2 delivery driver, accidentally closed the shutter on his left hand which caused swelling and a lot of pain, he rung and had to wait for a replacement driver and was put in another truck which broke down, recovery vehicle came but the hydraulics went so had to wait for another recovery truck!!!! This taking more time/hours and then taken too a&e, has the company breached anything?? My partner still on route too the hospital time since accident is over 7 hours!!!

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The company haven’t necessarily done anything wrong. They may have been inept in their handling of this situation and perhaps should have got your Partner to Hospital sooner than they have, but that would not constitute a claim.

      Reply
  13. Robert

    It is now over 5 years since my accident at work I was closing a glass door when it shattered I was left with two scars on my right hand and it seems no one wants to bear the responsibility for this I am disappointed that there seems no other help for me it is shocking to say the least when insurance companys my employer and who ever else can make all the excuses of the day and the law seems to permit it.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      UK Law allows a maximum claim limitation period of 3-years from the date of an accident in which it is possible to take action. In your case, were you represented by a specialist Solicitor? If you were and you feel that they haven’t adequately represented your interests you could seek to make a professional negligence claim against them. If you need any help with this, we do work with a partner firm who could assist with such matters.

      Reply
  14. James

    I cut my hand on a piece of metal. It cut through my thumb and tore my tendon. I had to get an operation to repair it, they found it in my wrist and had to stretch it back to my thumb. I had to get physio twice a week for 12 weeks then once a fortnight as I lost all the strength in my hand. My employer paid me my full wage while I was off for 4 weeks. Would I be entitled to make a claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It is good that your employer payed you in full – that at least stops you having to cope with a loss of wages after your accident at work and them paying you will not prevent you from being able to pursue a claim for compensation.

      Whether or not you have a valid claim will depend on whether your employer failed in their duty of care to provide you with the correct protection, training and equipment. The best way to find out if you do have a valid claim for accident at work compensation is to call us on 01225430285 and speak with our expert staff.

      Reply
  15. Susan

    I was coming out of the school door and fell over a bicycle that was laid right by the doorway. I had to go to the hospital and had to have my wedding ring cut off and now I have to keep a splint on my hand for 2 weeks as I have sprained my wrist.

    All the school told me to do was to put it down in the accident book.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Should you make a claim for compensation as a result of the tripping accident scenario you describe, the defence that the insurers would be likely to mount would be to argue that their insured (the school) could not be held liable as the bike was simply placed there by someone and not parked in a sensible location.

      However, the school could be liable in this matter if they do not have a defined bike parking area or system of ensuring that any hazards – including the ‘dumped’ bike that caused you to fall – that could present danger to visitors and users of the premises. Do you know if bikes being abandoned in dangerous places is something that has happened before or regularly? Do the school actively remind pupils as to where to park their cycles?

      It is certainly worthwhile our having a chat with you regarding this accident to see if we can pursue a claim against the schools insurers for the injuries you sustained and the loss of your wedding ring. It is good to see that the accident details have been recorded within the accident book – this could be useful evidence should a claim proceed.

      Reply
  16. Ewelin styejh

    I had an accident at work 7 month ago. As a result, I spent 5 months in Hospital before I was able to go home. My employer has never really talked to me about what happened and certainly hasn’t said sorry. This has motivated me to decide to claim compensation now. The reason is that my hands were amputated. I want to pursue this to court because they offer me £250,000 but I did not accept.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Do you have a specialist personal injury compensation Solicitor representing you in this claim? You would certainly need expert representation in this matter, such as that offered by Direct2Compensation and the specialist Solicitors with whom we work. Given the severity of the injuries you sustained, you will need to ensure that any settlement properly compensates you and provides the appropriate level of compensation to cover future care costs, home adaptations etc.

      You can contact us if you need any assistance with this matter.

      Reply
  17. Gary Ford

    I have damaged to fingers in a work accident – my fingers were crushed and I have lost my nails and have nerve damage. Do I have a claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Contacting you by email is not a problem in terms of helping you find out whether or not you have a valid claim for compensation. Clearly, you have suffered painful injuries to the fingers including nerve damage. Hand/finger injuries are a serious matter and the possible value of a claim for such injuries can lead to substantial settlements given the importance of the hand and the need to be able to use and control the fingers when gripping and performing tasks.

      Whether or not you have a claim will depend on how your fingers came to be crushed? Perhaps you could reply to me by email (ian@direct2compensation.co.uk) to advise as to how you were injured. It would be useful to know if issues such as a lack of training, no safety guards or personal protective equipment are of relevance in your accident.

      Reply
  18. marisha

    Hi the doctor says I have a repetitive strain injury in my hand due popping so many mds trays in my job as a Dispenser. As I work for the company still I am dubious to make a claim in case I am managed out of the business. Looking to see if this would be the case?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK Law, you are afforded a legal right to pursue your employer for compensation should an injury or health condition you have sustained as a result of their negligence or insufficient management of your health and safety at work. Whilst you are concerned that you would suffer poor treatment if you were to pursue a claim, you need to consider the impact that your RSI could have upon you should you not make a claim.

      We would be happy to assist you further with an investigation in to your claim and invite you to contact us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  19. Lorrain

    I have only been in my job 5 months, 2 weeks ago I injured my hand in the works heavy folding lift door causing severe swelling. I was given first aid on site and could not use my hand so I went to hospital. I had an x-ray which showed the tissue & tendons were very swollen, I was told to keep my hand elevated & to apply ice, also it would take 2 to 3 weeks to heal, longer if I used it. I was told I cannot get sick pay because I have not been there long enough, what should I do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is no requirement for the employer to provide sick pay, but you should qualify for SSP.

      To recover the rest of your lost income and obtain compensation for your injuries and other losses, you can seek to make a claim against your employer. In your case, were you trained to use the door? Was there a fault with the heavy door?

      You could call us on 01225430285 so that we can discuss your enquiry in detail and identify whether or not you can pursue a claim against your employer.

      Reply
  20. Scott

    I am a self employed window fitter and I sub contract through a company. On Monday I was removing a large section of single pained glass from a window on a customers house. Our company as well as many other window installers know that smashing glass out into a dustsheet/tarpaulin is far safer than trying to removing it whole. The customer was adamant that he didn’t want us to do it that way and made me try and remove it whole. This ended up causing the large section of glass to crack and badly cut my hand open. I have been told by Torbay Hospital that I will need an operation at Exeter Hospital with a Plastic Surgery team as I have no feeling in my thumb and cannot move it. They suspect that I have cut my tendon and caused numerous nerve damage. I am unsure of how long i’m going to be off work for. Can I claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You have clearly suffered a very nasty laceration at work and the fact that you now face surgery indicates the severity of your injury. Given the impact that this will have on your life for the next couple of months, it would be wise to further investigate as to whether or not you have a valid claim for work accident compensation.

      To succeed with a claim, you would need to be able to demonstrate employer negligence in this incident as it is unlikely that you could hold the customer liable. Although you are a self-employed sub-contractor, the company for whom you were working does still have a responsibility to your health and safety at work. With this in mind, we would be interested to know what personal protective equipment requirements the employer placed on you or provided – such as safety gloves. Also, did the company instruct you to remove the pane of glass whole despite your ‘usual practice’ being to smash it on to a dust sheet?

      Reply
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