Injured in a ladder accident at work? See if you can claim compensation

62 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

One of the most common accident at work claims are for falls from ladders. When any employer requires a member of staff to work at height using a ladder, it is vitally important they provide the correct equipment and adequate training to ensure that the risks of injury are minimised.

Table of contents:

Causes of ladder accidents

Placing a ladder in a dangerous position without adequate support. Employers must ensure that any staff members working at height have been given the correct training to fully understand how to minimise the risk of a ladder tipping or slipping, and how to identify a safe location for a ladder to be erected.

Using a ladder that is not fit for purpose. Many employers do not provide a ladder of an adequate length, and this leads to a worker having to overreach beyond a safe distance and risk the ladder tipping over. Employers have a duty to ensure that all staff using ladders at work are made aware of the ‘3 points of contact’ ladder rule. This reminds workers that they must always have 2 hands and 1 foot or 1 hand and 2 feet on the ladder at any one time.

How to tell if you have a valid claim

If your employer failed to provide you with any training in safe ladder use, or you can demonstrate that the accident was the result of employer negligence or that of another party, you can seek to make a claim for ladder accident compensation.

The claim needs to be made within three years of the accident. It is also important that the details of your accident have been recorded with your employer in an accident book and that you have sought medical attention for the injuries you have sustained.

If you haven’t recorded the accident yet, don’t worry, we can help. If you’re not sure that you’re eligible to claim, please contact our expert team and we’ll be able to let you know.

How much can you claim for?

Compensation settlement amounts will vary depending on the injury. The final settlement value will be reached after medical evidence is reviewed and a medical report completed for your solicitor. Clearly, the more pain and discomfort suffered, the higher the value of your compensation. It’s typically affected by:

  • The type and extent of an injury sustained
  • Whether or not you have made a full recovery from the injuries
    Amount of lost income and costs incurred
  • Care required by family and friends – such as transport, help around the house or with shopping etc.
  • Any pension loss
    The cost of paying someone to carry out tasks which you could do before your accident but cannot do now, such as decorating or gardening
  • Treatment and rehabilitation costs such as physiotherapy or massage
  • The cost of any surgery after your accident (you are not forced to have this on the NHS and are entitled to claim for the cost of surgery privately, particularly if this speeds up your recovery)

Whilst some injuries after a fall from a ladder can be immediately obvious – such as a broken leg or arm – some possibly more serious ones may not. Some of the symptoms or damage caused may not be known for months or years. As such, it is important that medical attention be sought early to provide the vital evidence needed to support any claim for compensation.

Support and advice

At Direct2Compensation our staff understand that anyone injured in an accident work will have many questions about making a claim for compensation. Typically, our clients are worried about how making a claim will affect their relationship with their employer and how the claims process works.

We are here to offer the support and advice which will give you the confidence to be able to pursue your claim. From your first contact through to the end of the process, we take the hassle out of claiming. Our expert staff will quickly obtain the information needed to get your claim started and can answer your questions in simple, straightforward terms.

62 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

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Questions & Answers

  • Ian Morris

    This is certainly a matter our specialist Solicitors can consider for you. Please use the ‘start your claim for compensation‘ form on our website to make further contact.

    It would be useful to know whether your builder carries insurance for their work? (did you check with them at the outset?).

    Reply
  • David

    Hi I fell 4-5m from a ladder in the wet, looking back at pictures of the ladder i fell from there’s a couple of the runs that have damage and are bent like a “v” shape. I would just like to know whether that ladder should have been Condemned and not used at all in the first place?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the ladder you were being tasked with using was defective, damaged or unfit for safe use – as would appear to be the case, the employer should have removed it from use and provided a safe replacement. The fact that the employer didn’t remove the ladder indicates that they do not employ a routine inspection of the equipment that they are asking staff to use. These failings by the employer is likely to be seen as employer negligence and would enable you to hold the employer liable for your injuries and losses caused by the accident.

      Along with providing safe equipment, your employer should also have provided the appropriate training to ensure that you could use a ladder safely, both to work at height safely and also how to identify whether a ladder was fit for purpose for the job in question.

      If you have not already pursued a claim for compensation, we feel that you have every right to do so and would like to help you.

      Reply
  • Paul harvey

    I’m self employed labourer working with bricklayers. I’ve fallen off ladder second lift up. I was carrying a water bottle at the time, I had my 3 points of contact on ladders at no point was I told not to carry stuff up or down ladder by site manager. I didn’t have tool box talk regarding this they have footage off me landing on ground, the ladder has since been altered and now they are putting stairways in. I’ve got compound fracture of my left elbow, just wanted some advice.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The lack of training provision from your employer is clearly responsible for your accident and you would appear to have a valid claim. You have up to 3 years from the date of the accident in which you can pursue a claim. It is important to ensure that an accident book entry has been made so that there is evidence to show the injury happened at work. Did an Ambulance attend the scene?

      If and when you are ready to make a claim, please call us on 01225430285 so that we can help you.

      Reply
  • Neil

    Hello Ian, I tripped on the top step of a step ladder going into the back of trailer. I fell flat injuring my hip and knees. The gate on the step ladder had been removed – if it had not it would have stopped my fall. I have a personal risk assessment stating I should not use step ladders to enter trailers because of my disability knee. Work have ignored my risk assessment and put me on this job for over 4 years causing me physical and mental stress. I have been off work now for over 4 months, would I be able to put a claim in?

    Reply
  • Danielle

    My partner had a accident at work last Wednesday, he was at a clients house sanding and polishing their staircase. He usually worked with another colleague who had recently left who was of 6ft+ in height – he had been provided a hop up which allows them to reach a higher distance however my partner is only 5ft 5 and the hop up was not sufficient when working on his own.
    He used a ladder from the client to polish the banister, the ladder had slipped and he fell backwards about 5ft onto the stairs. He was taken to A&E had bloods and CT scan, thankfully only suffered from soft tissue and muscle bruising however he is in a lot of pain.
    He has got a doctors letter today saying to be off for another 2 weeks.
    Does he have a claim if he was provided a hop up but used a clients ladder without notifying the employer?
    The boss picked up his van keys yesterday and said he would pay him full for Thursday, Friday and Monday but from today SSP but when he is back at work he will be put on light duties, he also said he is not liable to pay him full wages as the actions he took he should not have taken as he was provided with the hop up not a ladder, however said he would look into getting a higher hop up now.
    Many thanks

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      This is a difficult matter. In some respects, one can see how your partner made (with the benefit of hindsight) a poor judgement in using a customers ladder. However, on the other hand there is clearly a case for the employer to ensure that appropriate equipment is provided. This is a matter where a claim would seem worthy, but the claimant may have to accept some element of contributory negligence.

      Reply
  • John

    I had an accident at work today, I was using a ladder to access scaffolding the ladder was tied with ropes but one the knots untied and I fell from about 1.5meters on to my back and I have been in pain since. I only have a CITB pass sheet and don’t hold the card yet. Can you help advise me?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You can make a claim for compensation for the pain and discomfort caused by the ladder falling from the scaffolding and you can make a claim without jeopardising your future employment or damaging your employer. When someone is injured in an accident at work – such as your fall from a ladder, a claim can be made against the mandatory insurance cover that employers or 3rd party site management companies must have in place.

      Please call us on 01225430285 to further discuss your accident and get specific advice about your rights after an accident at work and how we can help you to claim compensation on a No Win No Fee basis.

      Reply
  • David

    I fell from a step ladder at work, breaking my arm in the process. I reported this immediately and sought medical attention. I was working on the ladder for a short time and hadn’t realised that I was as stood on the top rung of the ladder, as I tried to step down, the ladder fell out from under me.

    Whilst I am aware I should not have been on the top step of the ladder and accept responsibility for that, I wouldn’t have been using the ladder had there been appropriate clear space for me to use the correct equipment. I have complained multiple times about the state of the site and in particular the area that I was working.

    I have been on SSP since then. I have my own income protection insurance, but the insurance company have access to my employers written report which effectively apportions all of the blame on me and I fear they may not pay out because of that.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If this hasn’t already been looked at by a Solicitor, it would be a good idea for one of our specialist Personal Injury Solicitors to speak with you. Although you may well have to accept some contributory negligence to your situation, as you have raised concerns about the site, the risks to your health due to the working environment and the employer has done nothing, you have a right to make a claim for personal injury compensation.

      Reply
  • Andrew Mulligan

    I got a job cleaning windows. I was doing this for 3 weeks and never had training. It was raining one day and the ladder I had was too small. A bigger ladder came but the house was on an arch. The ladder was wobbly and taped and I was told from another colleague it was a 2 man job as I didn’t have experience and another person should have been holding the bottom of ladder. Well that didn’t happen and I fell 20 feet and had 10 minutes to live. I couldn’t walk for 7 months with 16 rods in a cage on my right leg and my bones sticking out my left with artery damaged. I don’t know if I have any right to compensation as the employer is saying no.

    Can you give me advice please as I cant walk right for another year and a half and was just left to it.

    Kind regards

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      We are able to get some specialist advice for you with a potential to pursue a claim against the employer. The employer has no right to decide whether or not you should be entitled to compensation for your injuries as this is a matter that needs to be considered by a specialist personal injury Solicitor.

      Reply
  • Steve

    I fell from a ladder on 27/01/20 after it slipped. I have had no training at working at height and employer is being prosecuted by health and safety due to inadequate equipment. I suffered a fractured eye socket in 3 places, a fractured femur which I had surgery next day with a dynamic hip screw and anti rotation screw put in. I also suffered a destroyed wrist which had surgery with a volar locking plate put into my wrist. I have not been working for 14 weeks now which for only last 2 weeks have been able to weight bear on leg and wrist, the question I am asking is am I entitled to anything?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can help you make your claim. The scenario you describe regarding the lack of training regarding safe working at height and the fact that your employer appears to be facing action from the HSE indicates that you have a strong and valid claim for personal injury compensation after your accident at work.

      Our Solicitors would be very happy to pursue your claim on our No Win No Fee terms and would seek to recover the appropriate compensation settlement for the injuries you have sustained – including the initial pain, the subsequent impact on your day-to-day life and the impact that those injuries will have on you for the long term as well as ensuring that any loss of income (both up to know and going forward) are recovered. Given the injuries you have sustained it could be the case that your compensation settlement would be a substantial sum.

      You can contact us on the phone or ask us to call you at a time that suits you. Alternatively, you can email your contact details to us and we’ll be in touch to help you.

      Reply
  • M. Rizwan

    Hi, just wanted to know if i have a valid claim?

    A friend of a friend wanted some cctv fitted to he’s property, which i agreed to install. Using my own tools to get the job done, as i was cabling at height using a ladder, which was held by below by the property owner, the ladders slipped which hence made me fall from height causing a severe injury. Which had taken me out of work for 5 to 6 months before going back to light duties again. Just wanted to know if there is a claim present for either falling at property etc?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Notwithstanding the severity of your injuries, it is hard to see how you could pursue a claim for compensation in this scenario. You have agreed to perform the work and have used your equipment to do so. The homeowner has assisted in holding the ladder, but to establish that they had been negligent and that this caused you to fall is likely to be impossible.

      Reply
  • Rob

    I had an accident at work seven years ago where I was knocked from a ladder. I fell and fractured my hip in four places. I had surgery to place hip screws the same night. I was advised that the screws had to stay in for two years and that I could not to return to my job until they were removed.

    During that time, I was only receiving limited pay and was getting absence warnings from work. The employer admitted liability straight away but I could only return for short hours and I receiving half pay or less. I eventually became bankrupt, so most of the money I received from the claim I made was taken by the insolvency dept.

    I am now getting arthritis in my leg and terrible back pain due to losing leg length on the injured leg. I was just wondering if I can make a new claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Unfortunately, you cannot now make a 2nd or new claim for the worsening of your injuries – despite the clear severity of them and the impact that they will have on your entire future.

      With regards to your settlement being taken by the Insolvency practitioners that handled your bankruptcy, were you given any advice on that issue at the time and with your claim, was your loss of income recovered in full? These are issues you should discuss with the practitioner and your Solicitor.

      Reply
  • Gwen

    My friend fell off a ladder that broke and he crushed his ribs. What should he do? He’s a trucker on duty.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Anyone injured in an accident at work should ensure that a full report of the injury is made in writing with the employer. Commonly, this would be in an accident book, but some employers will have a different system of recording accidents in the workplace. However, the key thing is to ensure that it is reported in order that supporting evidence is available should an employee later feel the need to pursue a claim for compensation.

      Reply
  • Gerry

    I was using a ladder to get into the loft, the ladder slipped and I fell from ceiling height. I’d said several times that a 2nd person was needed to foot the ladder but there wasn’t one. Does this make it my responsibility?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you fell from the ladder whilst at work, your employer is likely to have some responsibility to ensure that you are able to use a ladder safely. UK safe working practices would require an employer to provide training and guidance for those expected to work at height, including safe ladder usage. An employer would also have an obligation to look in to your report of a risk of injury when you suggested that a colleague should be assisting with safety.

      The apparent failure of your employer to fulfill their obligations in this accident at work, could indicate employer negligence and that may enable you to pursue a claim against them.

      If your accident was recent, make sure that an accident book entry or incident report has been completed at work. The report should indicate that you had mentioned that a colleague should assist or if you have not had any training etc. You should also ensure that appropriate medical attention is sought to ensure that medical evidence is available to support any future claim.

      If you would like our help in looking further in to making a claim and getting some more advice about your situation, please call us on 01225430285 or ask us to call you and our team will be able to help you.

      Reply
  • Richard

    If you’re told to lean an old 8 foot a frame ladder against the building, climb up and chip hammer brick out of a wall using the hammer 13 feet high above your head, is that negligence by my employer and third party gg2 there for safety and production? I broke 7 ribs, collapsed lung, 3 herniated discs and severe nerve damage.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The accident at work scenario you describe does raise questions about the employers approach to health and safety and whether or not they have acted correctly.

      Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can further discuss your accident and then seek some advice for you from our specialist Solicitors. Alternatively, you can ask us to call you if you prefer.

      Reply
  • Jayne

    My boss has just got me to sign the riddor accident form but i think the information is wrong on there. Does this matter? I fell off a folding aluminium platform 3 step hop up stool ladder. My boss has put i fell off a step ladder and that i was on the top rung. But i think if its a hop up step i am allowed to stand on the top? I don’t know if i can make a claim or not as i was not looking when i fell. I have broken the radial head of my elbow. But have not took no time off, i am under the hospital. I wonder if you can give me some advice on this please?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should ensure that the report is amended before you sign it – or amended afterwards if already signed – to reflect the correct information. There is clearly a difference between being stood on the top rung of a step ladder and being stood on the top of a hop up stool and having an incorrect record of this incident benefits no party, especially yourself.

      You may have a right to make a claim for compensation. You are right in that you are able to stand on the top of a hop up stool. However, an employer should ensure that you are not asked to stand on one in a dangerous area – such as if it is on uneven or slippery ground, or if you are having to over-stretch to reach items.

      Reply
  • Darren

    I fell from a ladder after it slipped. A workmate was supposed to be footing the ladder but walked away. The ladder was too short for the task and I was on the second to last step. I came down from around 3 meters and landed on my right side. I had bruising to my hip and ankle and suffered a broken shoulder which seems to have left me with nerve damage. I am waiting to see a specialist. If I was to make a claim would it be against my workmate or my employer? I don’t want to get him in trouble!

    I told my boss that I fell because I was over reaching because my workmate said a few days after the accident that that is what happened but my hospital records state that the ladder slipped. I was confused and in a lot of pain when I went to a&e but I genuinely thought that the ladder slipped.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you were to claim, it would be against your employer and their employer liability insurance cover. Whilst your colleague shouldn’t have walked away, you would not be claiming against them.

      Reply
      • Darren

        Is this something that you could help me with?

        Reply
        • Ian Morris

          We can certainly assist in the process of further evaluating whether or not you can proceed with a claim for compensation after your accident at work.

          The first point of action is for you to speak with our team so that we can take some initial basic information from you so that we can then present your claim enquiry to our specialist Solicitors so that they can review the details and contact you directly to discuss this matter with you and advise you further regarding pursuing a No Win No Fee claim for compensation.

          Reply
  • Tonya Tucker

    I fell from a ladder at work & fractured my shoulder, got 3 stitches in my eye. The following week I was told by multiple coworkers the ladder wasn’t safe & should have been removed from line. The ladder was replaced after my accident, it was unstable & didn’t lock down like it was intended! My company has paid my medical bills, therapy, & mileage for appointments! I have a scar on my right eye & still healing from shoulder fracture! I am now working with a restitution until Dr releases me. My question is can I sue the company for the fall because of unsafe equipment? Would it be worth suing money wise? What kind of lawyer would be best to represent my case if I have one?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law, any employer who tasks a staff member with using a ladder that is unsafe or without having provide training for use of ladders and working at height can be claimed against should an employee have an injury due to the employers negligence.

      Given the severity of your injury, you should instruct a specialist personal injury lawyer to represent you and recover compensation for your injuries and associated costs.

      Reply
  • Tim Frey

    So I was using a telescopic ladder, I have adequate training and take all necessary steps to ensure safety. The ladder snapped in half when I was 8 ft up attempting to gain access to attic crawl space. I was at work and didn’t suffer serious injuries but back and leg pain.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the ladder belonged to an employer, they would have a responsibility to ensure that the item was safe for use and that it was appropriately maintained and inspected and you could possibly make a claim for the back and leg pain you have sustained as a result of this incident.

      If the ladder is yours and is relatively new, you could possibly make a claim against the manufacturer on the grounds of a manufacturing defect. However, such a claim would be very hard to get off the ground and it could be that a supporting engineers report would be needed to confirm that there was a fault with the ladder.

      Reply
      • Timothy

        Ladder indeed did belong to company and this isn’t the first accident on this type of ladder. My first but not within the company. But in my training it states that it is my responsibility to inspect ladder before each use. I deemed it to be safe but it clearly wasn’t.

        Reply
        • Ian Morris

          This is a difficult one to take further as it appears that the employer has provided clear guidance and training regarding ladder use and safety. If they have instructed you to inspect the ladder before use and you have done that and reported no problems, the employer is unlikely to be held liable.

          Do you know if any other complaints have been made about these ladders?

          Reply
  • Matthew martin

    Recently I was working down my employers house cleaning out a loft for her I had to use a ladder to gain access to said loft just above head height. As I was exiting the loft I lowered myself down onto the ladder at which point it rocked at fell away from me resulting in me falling to the floor and landing on my elbow and breaking the radius in my arm (at the elbow joint) nobody had been holding the ladder. My employer asked me to go and sit down and have a drink and then continued her conversation with the builder on site coming back 2 check on me twice in 20 minutes to ask if I was ok to which I replied I heard a crack in my elbow. After a further 10 minutes I was driven to the a&e on the insistence of another employee, can I claim for injury and negligence against my employer?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Yes, you can make a claim. If your employer is requiring you to work at height and use ladders, they have a responsibility for ensuring that you are working safely and that you have been given the adequate training to work safely.

      If you would like to make a claim, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  • Johnny

    Hi I fell off another builders set of ladders that I was sub contracting to about 18 months ago. These ladders after checking them weren’t the best ladders. The fall resulted in me breaking my arm in several places and needing surgery to put metal plates and screws in my arm. I also wasn’t insured at the time so lost out on 3 months pay due to time off. My arm is getting worse and worse every week now and with been a self employed plasterer with 3 kids it is quite worrying. Basically I was just wanting to know if you think I had some sort of claim as the way things are going I think I may need to find another profession as plastering is just making my arm worse as it is in constant pain. Thanks very much.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Simply falling from ladders due to slipping or misplaced footing would not see a claim succeed. However, if ladders are defective, broken or if the worker has not been given specific training for safe ladder use a claim may well succeed.

      However, in this case the issue could be proving what happened and having evidence to support a claim. What has been put in writing regarding your accident and have the ladders been retained?

      Reply
  • Josh

    I was working on a ladder on a roof, the ladder slid out from under me and I fell on to the roof and then on to the ground, breaking my foot which lead to me having surgery and pins put in.

    When I reported the fall my employer told me not to say I was on the roof because I wasn’t suppose to be on it with out being tied off but when I was trained for the job they never showed me how to tie off. The people that trained me told me to get on the roof to do the job which isn’t the correct way to do it.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You have been badly advised by your employer with regards to making an inaccurate report of the accident. If there is no written evidence to support the fact that you were injured having fallen from height, you could struggle to succeed with a claim for compensation.

      The lack of training in safe working at height is negligence and would usually be something you could then attach employer negligence to.

      Reply
  • Deborah Brown

    I fell off a ladder while decorating for a wedding. My employer and I were the only people working at the time. She has been told by other employees to hold the ladder while someone is up the ladder. During the time of the fall she was standing beside the ladder looking at me draping. Not realising she wasn’t holding the ladder, I reached to drape the pole when the ladder folded underneath me. I broke 3 ribs and had a lung contusion. 3 days later, 2 litres of blood filled my lungs putting back in the hospital for a period of 7 days. My employer didn’t come to see me until I was ready to be released for a period of 10 minutes when visiting hours were near over and I haven’t heard from her since.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      UK Health and Safety at Work requirements are very strict when it comes to working at height and the use of ladders should only be done in instances where staff have been appropriately trained and know how to use ladders safely and where the limitation of ladder use should be identified.

      In the circumstances you describe, you would appear to have a valid claim under UK law and we advise you to make further enquiries with us via the website ‘start a claim’ function so that we can assist you.

      Reply
  • Warren peel

    Unfortunately I fell off a ladder at work due to wet conditions and mud on the rungs. The site was very muddy due to machines running up and down over walk ways. I have been in touch with a firm and they made enquiries but said they’re unwilling to take the claim on as reports from the sub contractor I was working with from his son stated I was leaning to far back on ladder.
    This was definitely not the case I’m a 52 year old man with years of experience on ladders I broke several ribs had a Haemothorax and spent 6 days in Harrogate hospital and was off work for more than 6 months due to injury.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The circumstances you describe would indicate that there is a claim worthy of investigation and clearly, the defendants have so far produced a witness statement that appears to apportion blame on you for the incident. The fact that the witness was the Sub-Contractors Son would indicate that the witness isn’t truly independent so that is of interest.

      Did you sign paperwork with the previous firm? If you instructed them on a No Win No Fee basis we could take a look at their file of papers.

      Reply
  • Richard

    Fell off ladder at work and broke my ankle, am i entitled to any compensation?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It is likely that you would succeed with a claim against your employer – as long as you were not responsible for your own fall as a result of your own negligence. If you fell from the ladder because of a lack of training in safe working at height, due to a faulty ladder or any other form of employer negligence, you can make a claim for compensation against your employer for the injuries you have sustained and any associated losses you have incurred.

      Call us on 01225430285 – our expert staff will be able to explain your rights and we’ll help you pursue a claim for compensation.

      Reply
  • Rachel

    My partner 3 years back was employed and fell off a ladder which left him with 2 broken arms and a broken Wrist, he has had 4 operations and a long time out of work. He returned back to work a short while back not doing anything strenuous just scanning as he can’t lift. He put in for a claim which recently he had won the case and the settlement has been paid, but his solicitor has said they needed to see evidence of any savings which he hasn’t got so sent off bank statements which shows obviously his weekly wage. His solicitor has sent back a very abrupt letter asking my partner to contact him immediately concerning him returning back to work. My partner called his solicitor which has told him he’s very annoyed that he’s returned back to work, he didn’t realise he wasn’t allowed to not work and couldn’t not work for the rest of his life and had really life changing injuries and the fact that the defendant had admitted liability. What could possibly happen now? Could they try and take the money back even though they had settled? Many thanks.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the claim is settled, it is settled and there is nothing that could be done to recover any settlement from your partner – unless it was found that he had been fradulent – which is not the case here.

      There is no reason that I can see that your partner should not return to some form of work. Given that the work he is doing is not physical it cannot be argued that any loss of income claim should be repaid as it is likely that the work he is doing now is lower paid and clearly not the same as prior to his accident.

      Reply
  • Jo

    My husband fell from a ladder last week. The ladder folded inwards on itself whilst he was up it. As a result he has a broken bone in his foot , he has a walker boot and on crutches for 5 weeks. Employer does not pay sick pay only ssp. They have ‘offered’ him to return to work doing sit down work. However he is advised to elevate his foot as much as possible and obviously unable to drive to and from workplace. He is also in considerable pain. Could you offer any advice please?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It is good that his employer has offered light duties to your Husband but unfortunate that he cannot take advantage of that due to his injuries. Unfortunately, his employer is not obliged to pay his usual salary whilst he recovers and as you are probably aware, SSP is not sufficient income to survive.

      To this end, your Husband should consider making a claim for compensation against the employer for the accident. If he succeeds with such a claim, he could recover all lost income and receive compensation for his injuries.

      We would be very happy to pursue this claim for your Husband so I would suggest that he call us on 01225430285 to discuss this matter further and find out more about his rights.

      Reply
  • bella

    My husband fell from the ladder at work. He was on top of the roof painting and the ladder slipped from under him. he had another employee holding the ladder but the roof was steep and the ladder and my husband fell, the other guy managed to dodge the fall. my husband was taken to the hospital by his employer and X-rays of the right foot were done and showed a broken heel bone. a CT scan confirmed that it is broken in multiple places. there is bruising on the hip, scrapes on elbows and shoulder pain now. we have an apt with orthopaedic to see what treatment plan the broken heel with require (cast/surgery). the employer filed a case with workers comp and they have been in touch and are coming by friday for a statement by my husband. we have a 21 month old and I am unemployed because I recently graduated and am looking for a job, my husband was our only source of income. his employer told us workers comp will pay 80% of his income tax free but that wont cover all of our expenses that his normal income would. I don’t know what to do or what I am entitled to. my husband has been in bed and is on pain meds until we can be seen by orthopaedic.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      In the UK, such circumstances as described should lead to a successful claim. The damage caused to your Husband’s heel is clearly serious and a long term recovery, most likely with some permanent implication from the injury lay ahead of him.

      In such a claim in the UK, the acting Solicitor would recover a large sum of compensation to cover the injuries sustained but also seek to recover ALL lost income and costs incurred because of the injury.

      Reply
  • Rhonda lasseter

    I fell off a ladder at work while performing my duties. However I found out after I fell the ladder was not a company approved ladder and the manager had brought it in from home. I have had a headache and unable to turn my head fully without pain and getting sick. I asked for an mri after the first two weeks of a headache but was told they would do therapy first. It took them 2 months to get me in to a physical therapist. And I haven’t gotten better. It also took nearly 2 months for them to compensate me. Now I can’t get caught up on my bills because of the late fees. Do I have a case against my employer and the workman’s comp insurance?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law, your rights would leave you able to pursue a claim against your employer here on the grounds of employer negligence. For the manager of the workplace to simply use a ladder from home that has not been correctly risk assessed and unlikely to be fit for purpose is a clear breach of statutory duty and would indicate that you would have a strong prospect of succeeding with a claim. It would also further increase your prospects of succeeding if the employer has failed to ensure that you have been adequately trained to work at height.

      Reply
  • john

    I recently fell from a ladder at work and fractured my elbow I had filled out accident report that had been posted to me with all that I could recall at the time but then after a few days i remembered that the ladder slipped before I fell and handed in another accident report my work are now wanting me to retract my second report which reports the ladder slipping which I refused, can I still make a claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Injuries sustained after falling from height can often be very serious and form a large part of our accident at work claim portfolio.

      On the basis of your comment, I believe you have a viable claim and should pursue the same forthwith. I would continue to refuse to withdraw the ‘2nd’ statement and in doing so, I would put my reasons in writing to them (retaining a copy for your records). You have mitigating circumstances that support the fact that you didn’t accurately describe the accident initially – you had just sustained a fracture to the elbow and were likely to be in a state of shock and pain – let alone a little fuzzy on pain relief.

      We would gladly pursue this matter for you via one of our specialist solicitors and I invite you to call us to us on 01225430285 so that we can discuss the situation.

      Reply
  • akbar

    Fell at work due to faulty ladders, sprained my wrist and mild head injuries, still getting head pains after 6 weeks an strong medicine. Had a ct scan an head, it’s come out fine and still getting wrist pains.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Dear Akbar

      I am sorry to hear about this incident and your injuries. If those ladders are faulty as you say, then you have a strong chance of winning a claim as your employer has clearly been negligent towards your safety whilst at work.

      I will email you directly also and look forward to hearing from you so that we can help you get your claim started.

      Reply
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