Employer responsibilities regarding injuries at work

228 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

Every company that employs staff is responsible for their health and safety whilst they are working. Whether this in the workplace or out on site, your employer should take the necessary steps to ensure that you are working in a safe environment. Health and safety laws are there to be followed to avoid accidents or injuries. If an employer does not have proper procedures in place, they can be prosecuted.

The government has a number of health and safety guidelines that must be followed and it is an employer’s legal obligation to ensure that these guidelines are implemented. If they haven’t been, then your employer is breaching their responsibilities.

Accidents in the workplace often occur when the proper procedures are not followed when carrying out an activity. This can sometimes be the fault of the employee but it can also be the fault of the employer. Employers have a legal obligation to ensure that all of their employees have had the right health and safety training so the number of incidents that cause injuries in the workplace can be reduced.

It is up to the employer to ensure that the work-related infrastructure is safe and free from any hazardous objects. The employer should also ensure that the working staff are provided with the necessary equipment to protect them while undertaking any strenuous activities. Your employer is responsible for carrying out risk assessments in the workplace and handling any aspects of health and safety. This includes allocating first aiders and providing training on lifting and handling office equipment.

After an accident at work

Your employer has a legal obligation to report any accidents that might occur in the workplace. Accidents are to be reported to the Incident Contact Centre of the Health and Safety Executive. Any accident regardless of how minor will need to be reported. It is the employer’s responsibility to understand the workplace accident, take the right measures, and provide the employee with relevant accident at work compensation.

It is highly important for employers to take accident at work claims seriously and provide the right compensation for the situation. An accident at work can be a major obstacle in the daily life of an employee. Thus, it is necessary to give an employee all the support needed to get back on his or her feet. Many a time, employees who have had an accident at work need to take leave and time off to recuperate from their injuries. In a situation like this, it is highly important to provide employees with adequate relief measures.

As an employer, it is also your job to explain to your employee how he or she is to claim and what kind of documents and certificates will be needed to claim correctly. You should typically employ a claiming service that will understand and uphold your rights, and impart the best advice to the people concerned.

What to do if you are injured at work

All employees should be trained and be aware of health and safety laws so that accidents don’t occur. However, if you have suffered an accident because of your employer not giving you the necessary health and safety training or because they have failed to implement health and safety laws, you will be entitled to seek compensation. If you been injured in a work related incident and your employer is taking no responsibility for the injuries you sustained, even though you believe that your employer was at fault, you need to speak to a solicitor sooner rather than later to get a compensation claim sorted.

Although you have three years in which to put in a claim for any personal injuries that you may have sustained during an accident either in public or in the workplace, it is always best to do it sooner rather than leaving it and the event being forgotten about. In order to ensure that you are going to get the best possible outcome for your case and also have the expertise of a solicitor who knows what they are doing, you should find a solicitor who specialises in accidental injury claims.

They can tell you whether or not you are entitled to claim for compensation and be able to give you advice about whether or not to pursue a case for compensation against your employer. Your solicitor will work for you on a no win no fee basis to ensure you get the compensation you are entitled to. They will negotiate on your behalf with your employer to reach a settlement.

228 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

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Questions & Answers


  1. Clive

    I slipped at work on a wet floor due to a fridge leaking and a tin fell on my head causing an inch cut to the top of my head. My employer only seemed to be worried about me getting back to work after 40mins my head was still bleeding a lot so I left the go to a&e.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Please call us on 01225430285 – you have a valid claim that would appear to be strong and our initial view is that our Solicitors would be likely to succeed and obtain you compensation for the injuries sustained. In your case, if there is any permanent visible scarring, the value of the claim settlement would reflect that along with consideration of other injuries and loss of income or other incurred costs.

      If you would prefer us to call you, you can either ask us to call you or you can provide further information by starting your claim on our website.

      Reply
  2. John

    I had an accident at work that needed an operation to correct the problem but this operation has failed and I require another operation.
    Due to a mixture of sick leave and the Furlough system I haven’t worked for 10 months but due to lack of funds i need to return to work but will not be able to do my original job till after the next operation. The company has excepted full responsibility for the accident, can my employer refuse to find me another job and make me unemployed. Also since the accident was the company’s fault can I ask them to pay privately for the operation as due to Covid 19 it may take a long time before the NHS can do the operation.
    Thank you
    John

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The only way that you can ensure that payment of any medical/rehabilitation costs is made by the employer is to make a claim against them for the injuries sustained in an accident at work. By making a successful claim, you would recover compensation for the injuries sustained and the pain/discomfort caused by them, recover any loss of income and also medical costs.

      If you have not already made a claim, please call us on 01225430285 to start your claim and get the ball rolling.

      In terms of your employer and whether they can dismiss you for being unfit to perform the duties you were employed to perform, they do have a right – after due process – to terminate your employment. However, the employer would only wish to do so if there was no realistic prospect of your return to work in the relatively near future. Given your situation, your employer will likely either find alternative ‘light duties’ for you to do until your next surgery, or keep you on sick leave until you have had surgery and are able to return to your pre-accident duties.

      Reply
  3. Beverley

    My Son works for a timber yard with little to no HS. His boss requested he cut timber in the large Saw which he’s not been trained on and because he refused hit him in the face with a mask and walked off. He has worked there 2 years on minimum wage

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      This is a matter that should be reported to the person(s) in charge and potentially to the Police as the employer has assaulted your Son. In terms of a personal injury claim, if the incident caused any notable injury, it may be possible to pursue a claim via the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) scheme. However, the incident must have been reported to the Police, your Son must cooperate with the Police during their investigations and medical treatment must have been obtained to qualify for the scheme.

      Reply
  4. Mike

    I have been off of work for one year after undergoing an operation due to a work place injury. My surgeon says I can go back on very restricted duties, but my employer says I am employed to do a certain job so there’s no work for me. They have said they will see if there’s anything else I can do but doesn’t look likely. Where do I stand?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not the employer is entitled to refuse your return to work unless you can perform the duties you were initially employed to do is an employment law matter and should be addressed to a relevant specialist.

      In terms of your injury being caused at work, we can assist with a claim for compensation for the injury sustained including pain, discomfort and rehabilitation costs along with recovery of any loss of income caused by the absence from work. If you would like our help in making a claim for compensation, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  5. Aran

    My employer has regularly had my colleagues and I at work understaffed and fails to make much communication with us.
    Just under two years ago i had two operations on my right knee and due to the understaffing I’ve been struggling to keep up with the overflow of work and would not receive sick pay if I were to take time off (other than SSP).
    I’m very concerned that I may cause serious injury if I continue working under these conditions which my employer doesnt seem to be willing to rectify.

    What do you suggest I should do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should make a written report to your employer – so that they are on notice and cannot deny being on notice – of your concerns and of the risks you believe you face. The employer is then compelled to review practices and if applicable, make reasonable adjustments to the working environment.

      Reply
  6. Awa

    I worked in 3 different stores for a company that made me sign the health and safety handbook only yesterday. I have been lifting heavy objects and going up and down very hazardous stairs oftentimes full of boxes. Is there any way I can get compensation for this type of negligence? Thank you

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      What injuries have you sustained? If you have been injured and those injuries have been reported to the employer and noted by a medical professional, you can make a claim on the basis that you have not been given appropriate training and have been expected to work in a dangerous environment.

      Reply
  7. Mark

    last Friday my finger was caught under a clamp for the guillotine at work. I had to go to hospital for treatment but was told to return to work after which I did. On my return the first aider realised the wound was bleeding through the dressings I had just had put on at the hospital so re dressed it has I was told a meeting was to take place where they decided the accident was Human Error! I enquired about using a days holiday to enable me to go home for the rest of my shift that day but policy is we aren’t allowed time off throughout September and they had light duties I could do.
    On 30th Sept I was sent home from work due to my injured finger has I kept knocking it. I have now been to see my GP with the pain whom has prescribed me Antibiotics, given me a Tetanus jab, re-dressed my wound and given me a unfit for work note for 30day’s. My problem is I’m not totally certain my employers have dealt with the incident correctly and accordingly. Or if they have even treated me fairly in the first place when the accident happened. Any advice would be greatly appreciated thankyou

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Our specialist Solicitors can help in deciding whether your injury was caused through your error or because of a failing on the part of the employer. The Solicitors will want to know about the training you have had to use the machine in question and how the injury happened. It is no surprise that the employer is placing blame on your shoulders at this stage as you have had no representation or input in to their investigation.

      We would like the opportunity to speak with you to find out more about your work, what training you have had and how you were injured so that we can have this matter considered by our specialist Solicitors with a view to pursuing a claim for compensation. Our Solicitors can also consider whether your employment rights have been upheld or undermined and advise you on that.

      Use the start your claim service to provide some further information to us so that we can have this looked in to for you.

      Reply
  8. Margaret Thomas

    I was knocked down 12 weeks ago by a car reversing round a corner, my boss picked me up of the ground said I was fine, I have no memory of being knocked down so I phoned the local shop who had CTV cameras I got the police in hand but unfortunately the lady didn’t report it and they couldn’t get the car reg from the footage, my boss said it was nothing I. Then started to feel really ill after a few days and demanded to see a doctor who confirmed my injuries were whip lash and concussion, My boss also told me I had not hit my head the CCTV report said my head took the full blow and also when I landed on the ground a second blow, and sustained massive bruising and swelling to my left arm. I only received SSP. Why did my boss not phone an ambulance, I could have had a bleed to the brain because of her sheer negligence. I now suffer great ansiety and stress

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whilst your Boss probably should have called an Ambulance, there is no legal requirement for them to have done so and they probably didn’t appreciate that you were injured.

      In terms of your rights and options to make a claim for compensation, that is where we can help. Despite the identity of the 3rd party driver being unknown, we can still help you make a claim for compensation on a No Win No Fee basis via the MIB scheme for the people injured due to the actions of untraced drivers. As you have reported this incident to the Police and attended a medical professional for treatment, you would qualify for the scheme.

      Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can help you with your claim. Alternatively, you can also use our website to start your claim.

      Reply
  9. Mark

    Hit my finger at work and had an operation. Been signed of sick for 8 weeks.there were no health and safety workers there .

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Please call us on 01225430285 to start your no win no fee claim for personal injury compensation. If you’d rather that we called you, use our ‘contact us‘ tab to request a call and we’ll be in touch.

      Reply
  10. Jenna

    Hello I’ve recently hurt my back at work and had to take time off when I returned back to work one of the store managers said I was not to stack shelves… but other manager in the store made me do so which has resulted in my back being sore again… I’m wondering if that should be allowed due to having back problems

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you can or should lift is not a matter for any of the Management team at your workplace, but a matter for your GP. If your GP feels that you should avoid heavy lifting for a while, you should be provided with a conditional fit to work notice that indicates that you can work, but only on restricted duties.

      Reply
  11. Richard

    I have a knee injury which doing certain duties at work worsens, I have attended the works physio and he has sugested i avoid the duty that causes my knees to hurt but my employer keeps putting me on these duties even after getting the report back. I have also had chats with them about my knees and the take me off the work for a week then roster me back on it the following week this does not help what are my rights.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You need to speak with your GP regarding your knee issue and see if they can provide a Doctors note for you to pass to the employer.

      Reply
  12. douglas

    My son is an HGV delivery driver. Whilst using an electric pallet truck, it slipped on the wet tail board of his truck, resulting in his large toe (left foot) being dislocated. He went to A&E where they put it back in place. His employer has told him that he has to take at least 4 days off work and he has been told he will not get paid in this period and that he must claim SSP. Is this right?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Although your Son was injured in an accident at work, the employer is not obliged to pay his usual salary – unless their contract offers such a benefit. The legal position is that an injured employee who is not afforded sick pay within their contract of employment must claim SSP for any qualifying period away from work.

      Your Son’s only option to recover the lost pay is to pursue and succeed with a claim for personal injury compensation arising from the injuries sustained in the accident at work.

      Reply
  13. Anne

    I was delivering a letter for my employer, on foot, and tripped and fell on my face, causing injury requiring a trip to A&E. Is there any claim for compensation in this situation ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is only the right to make a claim if the cause of your trip and fall can be attributed to negligence – which in this case is likely to be disrepair to a pavement surface or a tripping hazard present that should have been known of and removed by the property owner in question.

      Reply
  14. Kristel

    If you have a serious injury at work and you are taken to A&E, does your employer have a legal duty to notify your next of kin immediately?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is unlikely to be a legal duty to advise the next of kin as that responsibility should rest with the emergency services and liaison officers.

      Reply
  15. Sita

    I broke my leg at work due to a wet floor sign not being put up after the floor was mopped . Who is responsible the company that employs me or the cleaner who didn’t put sign up ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It would be most likely that the cleaning company contracted to undertake the cleaning at the workplace would be the liable party. You certainly have a valid right to pursue a claim for compensation due to the cleaning contractors failure to erect a hazard warning sign after making the floor wet. If you would like our help in pursuing your claim, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  16. Zuleita

    If you were hit on top your head at work on a fork lift and your boss never called a ambulance because the empoyer said he call wife .cant the boss be reliable of this because if employee was hurt the boss should of done procedure of calling a ambulance anyway because the person with head injury was hurt and had no idea how bad ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer should always ensure that appropriate medical attention is obtained – wherever possible. Whether or not they should call an ambulance is somewhat ambiguous.

      In your case, you are likely to have a valid claim for personal injury compensation as a result of the injuries you have sustained in an accident at work. If you would like our help in pursuing this further, please call us on 01225430285

      Reply
  17. Stephen martin

    If I had an accident on site and then the employer decides to say I’m not meant to be there to cover their backs am I entitled to claim.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As long as the accident can be attributed to negligence, the details of any injuries have been reported and medical treatment received, you can pursue a claim.

      Reply
  18. tyler

    Does an employer have an obligation to take you to the hospital if needed?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      An employer has an obligation to ensure that an injured employee is not denied the opportunity to seek medical treatment. In normal circumstances, sensibility should prevail – for a serious injury, an ambulance should be called or where the injury remains serious, but it is safe to do so, an injured employee could be transported to Hospital by taxi or in a company employees vehicle. Of course, in some circumstances, an employee may take themselves to Hospital.

      Reply
  19. Jacob

    I punctured my wrist with some dirty metal at work the first aider advised me to visit hospital to at least get it cleaned and get a stitch or two if needed. I called my boss and explained the situation and advised I needed someone to come in and cover me so I can visit my doctor. He advised me there was no one else to cover me and I have to finish me shift. By the time I finish me shift my GP will not be open and I will have to pay £30 in a taxi for a round trip to my closest minor injuries hospital. I have asked for my boss to reimburse me for the travel as if I left when i was advised to by the first aider I could of got a bus which would cost £4 return and he has said he cannot. I explained if I left when advised by the first aider this cost would be a lot less. Also I now have two stitches and have been advised to not work 3-4 days to allow the wound to heal as my job is very physical and I am likely to open the wound again. For the sake of £30 I don’t want to cause a stir at work with my boss as it’s a new job and I’ve not long received my contract however o feel he put my health at risk by not allowing me to leave when advised.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The initial injury sustained would appear to be something for which we could pursue a claim for personal injury compensation. If successful, not only would our Solicitors recover compensation for the injury sustained, they would also recover lost income or incurred costs (including the taxi cost you mention).

      If you would like to pursue a claim or want to find out more about the process and how we can help you, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  20. Anna

    I want to ask a question please.

    I am a beauty therapist and I have demaged my wrist by doing so many massages at the spa I work.

    I am signed off by my GP doing massage for a half year now.

    Can they get rid off me during this period?

    Can I claim anything?

    Many thanks,

    Anna

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you can make a claim will depend on the workload your employer expected you to cope with and whether they should have been ensuring additional breaks or job rotation.

      Reply
  21. George

    Hi, what would happen if an employee is injured at work and broken their ankle but they are wearing the wrong footwear. The manager has already told the employee to wear appropriate footwear, and a short while later they are injured. How would situation be dealt with from an HR point of view? Thanks

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      In this scenario, the injured person can still make a claim but is likely to have to accept an element of ‘contributory negligence’ (probably 50% or so).

      Reply
  22. Robert

    Company line manager never put injury down in accident book or fill any details down

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If an employer has failed to make a correct report of an accident at work (or indeed any report), that reflects badly upon them and does place the injured person in a weakened position should they then wish to pursue a legal right to make a claim for accident at work compensation.

      In your case, you should write to the employer – both to your Line manager and copy to the HR department – to make them aware of what happened and how you were injured. You should list all relevant information including the date of the accident, the location, what you were doing and how you were injured and retain a copy in your sent email folder for future reference.

      Reply
  23. Charlie

    Hi there.
    I suffered an eye injury whilst working on a bailer with no eye protection only thing is It was off the books (a trial period he called it) and was denied access to the accident book. No P60 no P45
    They also had us working in unsafe conditions and put my life in danger more than once (demanding that I be lifted up to a height on the forks of the fork lift, to hang a wire over the rafters of the warehouse) no ropes or harnesses I have video evidence of this.
    I lost my job after persistently asking for the safer conditions and want to make sure no one else is out at risk.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Was your injury sustained within the past 3 years and if you have had medical treatment for the injury you describe, we may be able to pursue a claim for you. Of course, having evidence to support the fact that the injury was sustained at the workplace could prove to be the difference in such a claim failing or succeeding.

      Reply
  24. darren

    hi

    i am a self employed solar installer and fit the panels to the roofs for another ltd company. When screwing brackets to the outside of the roof i hit the main power cable that feeds the house from the grid which shouldnt of been there. This cable had been run in a strange way and was inbetween the roof truss and the felt at this location i was attempting to fix to. The resulting arc/explosion of the fixing and drill burnt my hand and i had to go to hospital for observations. i didnt check inside the loft before i started work as i would have clearly seen this error can i claim and who would i sue in this case?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the main power cable was fitted and installed negligently and not in accordance with the appropriate regulations, it may be possible to succeed with the claim. Do you know if it is known as to who installed the cable and when?

      To succeed with a claim for personal injury compensation, supporting evidence will be needed to substantiate the claim. In this case, that is likely to be the details of who installed the cable and when, along with a record of the incident within the site operators accident book. Also, if an Ambulance was called to the scene of the incident, that could provide sufficient evidence to prove you were injured on the site as described.

      Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can further discuss your accident at work and a potential claim for compensation.

      Reply
  25. Sharon

    My husband got stabbed at work by his workmate due to work matters and even today they did even help him with money or taking him back at work in fact they paid some of the hospital bills and sent the hospital to call him for the balance and he is not working l bought the medication l stood throughout the situation they just dumped him in ICU

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The assault on your husband was an act of criminal assault. Under UK law, if your Husband has reported the assault to the Police and cooperates with them fully during their investigations, he can pursue a claim via the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) scheme.

      Reply
  26. Zara

    Hi I strained and pulled muscle in arm at work not sure if it was done lifting pallet or trying to pull pallet truck that didn’t work . I only found out it didn’t work after u tryed to pull it . Within 1 hour my arm was in agony and I told my manager. The next day I was in work in agony and asked my manager to log a accident so she did . Went hospital that night was told I strained and pulled it had arm in sling . Messaged manager said I can work but light duty’s. Got in to work and the list of jobs for me was delivery which involves unpacking items and lifting heavy boxes . Still in agony I have appointment at doctors tomorrow and in due in work tomorrow night

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As you appear to have sustained injury due to a faulty or broken piece of equipment (faulty pallet truck), we would be happy to further investigate and consider your claim.

      Please call us on 01225430285 or use our ‘request a call back‘ service so that we can call you to offer help and start your claim.

      Reply
  27. Dan

    Hi Ian, I was making a delivery at a client on the same business estate, a hundred meters from base, when a shutter was raised and the shutter door fell off the hinges and caught me heavily on the head. My colleagues from work came down to help and went with me in the ambulance. I was off work on full pay for a month, then returned to work but ended up leaving the company as I didn’t like the night work.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Regardless of whether or not you have since left the job that you were doing when you were injured, or the fact that you received pay whilst off due to the injuries, the accident scenario you describe is something that you would be entitled to claim personal injury compensation for and we can help you with this – providing the accident happened within the past 3 years.

      Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can discuss this with you and explain the claims process before getting one of our specialist Solicitors on to this for you. Alternatively, if you would prefer, you can ask us to call you or you can make further contact with us directly via email to: justice@direct2compensation.co.uk

      Reply
  28. David Astley

    I had an accident at work and currently on sick.I have asked for their insurance details but will not give them to me.
    They said I need a personal representative to file a case to my employer and they will send i
    on to the insurance company
    Is this the correct procedure
    Thank you Dave

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Our specialist Solicitors can assist you in pursuit of a claim for personal injury compensation and would be able to obtain the required insurance information. Our No Win No Fee service would ensure that you would not face the risk of any costs should your claim fail.

      If you would like our help, please contact our team on 01225430285.

      Reply
  29. greg

    I hurt my arm couldn’t work, told me could go home I walked in pain home on my own… Should company have giving me transport home?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is no legal requirement for an employer to provide transport for an employee. However, there is always the moral side of things that should have seen your employer ensure you could get home without undue distress.

      In terms of your arm injury, how did that happen and what was the injury? You may have a right to make a claim for the injury you sustained at work. If you would like to elaborate on that with us – whether online or over the phone (01225430285), please do and we can then advise you further.

      Reply
  30. Kramer

    An employee went up a 45 to 50ft roof to repair leak..with no harness cos roof dont have u bolt hook to hook up harness..One of the manager was aware of situation..20min later didn’t see the skylight and step and fell down..shoulder breaks,face cheek bones fracture,ribs fracture and now employer is deciding to single him out stating that he shouldn’t be up there in first place..what to do in these type of situation???

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Our specialist Solicitors can help with a claim for personal injury compensation in this matter. For the employer to allow a worker to work at such a height without the appropriate safety devices and protection to prevent a fall, there is likely to be employer negligence that would be proven in a claim.

      If you would like us to take this claim further, please call us on 01225430285 or tell us your number here and we’ll be in touch.

      Reply
  31. Barry

    I have two separate injuries that have occurred at work. The first injury happened just over 2 years ago but is still not healed. The second injury is more recent and I am currently off work struggling to recover.

    The current injury is diagnosed as stress fractures in my lower spine and were found after a recent MRI scan I’ve had done. I have been told to expect that it will take between 6 months to 12 months to recover. I am 65yrs old and retire next April (2022).

    My older injury is a ligament tear in the right knee, but the Doctors are reluctant to operate on it (I am not sure why?).

    Both injuries occurred at work. I have strapped my knee up and managed to keep working until my second injury to my back forced me to stop work. I am now in the verge of being dismissed due to long term absence, 8 weeks so far. I work as a community caretaker for a housing company.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Please call us on 01225430285 because we feel that you may be able to recover compensation for both injuries. Importantly, if our Solicitors were able to succeed with claims on your behalf, you would also be able to recover loss of income for any period that you could not work due to the injuries. If you are forced to leave your job due to the injuries, if it is proven that the employer could have prevented them, but failed to provide you with the appropriate training, guidance, equipment and working environment to allow you to work safely, you could also recover loss of income up until your retirement date.

      We would very much like to speak with you to get some further information about your work and how the injuries were sustained. Our team can explain your rights and help you to understand our No Win No Fee service. Given the potential impact on the final years of your working life, you have every right to make a claim and we would like to help you with this. Our articles on knee and spinal injury claims may be of interest and should give you an idea of compensation amounts.

      Reply
  32. Marc

    Hi, work within a warehouse who hires out high-end kitchen furniture equipment for events, which include a range of CCG – Crockery, Cutlery & Glass items for many horse racing event, The BRITS, and The Queens Garde Party etc, when these items come back from the hirer they are often dirty and require a great deal of processing before wrapping and packing then placed back into stock for the next hirer.

    My injury would have taken place during the processing. This would have been repetitively placing the plates of 10″, 12″ or 13″ into stacks of 10 before shrink wrapping them before placing them into a box which would normally hold 20, 30, or even 40 plates before moving that box onto a pallet of a maximum of 30 boxes. It’s during this repetitive process that I felt a sudden twinge in my shoulder and thought no more of it. I continued to work doing this process for about 4 weeks in order to help out the kitchen area in the CCG process, during this time, again, felt a sudden twinge in the shoulder area, and again, thought no more of it.

    At this stage, the shoulder pain grew a little more severe which resulted in my restriction in shoulder movement so I explained these sudden twinges to one of our Warehouse Managers, who had explained to me, him being a regular rugby player outside of work, of what this could be, and he mentioned that I could have damaged a muscle in that area doing repetitive work or knocked it. He gave me an in-depth knowledge of the shoulder area and of the potential exercises that I could adopt.

    This armed knowledge seen me to the Friday morning, it was this morning that I could barely move my arm at all. The slightest movement in my right arm would sent severe pains shooting through my arm which would restrict me in anything that I would set out to do, it was like having my whole right are immobilised completely with pain and lack of sleep because of it.

    My question is this, is there anything that could be done about this at work, would I be able to return to work doing lighter duties, even at this stage this would result in VERY light duties as the pain is very severe at this stage?

    Marc

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It is really important to ensure that your employer is made aware of your injury being work related (in writing) at the earliest opportunity and it would be wise to reference what your Warehouse Manager said to you at the time.

      You should also seek medical attention from your GP and discuss with them whether or not you should have a total break from work for a while to allow the injury to settle or whether you would be ok doing light duties. As to whether or not the employer would have light duties available is a matter for them.

      In terms of your injury, there is a potential to make a claim. If the employer has not properly risk assessed the repetitive nature of the work or provided adequate training in the safe lifting and moving of the items you work with, a claim would be valid. If you would like to further discuss the potential of making a claim for personal injury compensation with us, please call our team on 01225430285.

      Reply
  33. Lawrence

    I injured myself on a delivery alley way with a heavy metal cage filled with frozen goods that went into one of the several pot holes on the alley way to our store but the employer says they are not responsible for it is the one that owns the alley way that is responsible for my accident

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As to who is liable/negligent in this scenario, it could well be that both the employer and the landowner are jointly held responsible. The landowner has a responsibility to ensure that the area is maintained and kept safe. The landowner must check for hazards (such as potholes that could cause tripping injury or in your case, the wheels of a stock cage to catch and tip over) and if repairs are required, repairs should be made. If they have failed to inspect the area and make it fit for purpose, they could be held liable.

      Interestingly, your employer also has a duty of care towards your health and safety whilst you work. They are obliged to ensure that they do not place you at an undue risk of injury. Whilst the alleyway may be the only access way for deliveries, that does not mean that the employer can ignore the obvious risks to your health by asking you to drag heavy stock cages across an area that is likely to cause injury.

      Our specialist Solicitors would be able to identify whether either party (or both) have liability for negligence in this matter and our initial view is that you have a valid claim that should be pursued (providing your injury is sufficiently serious). We would like to speak with you further regarding your claim and help you take this further. You can call us on 01225430285 or if you want us to call you, simply email your number and a good time to call you to: justice@direct2compensation.co.uk

      If you have not already obtained some photographs of the condition of the alleyway and ideally the actual hole that caused your injury (with a measurement), we would strongly recommend that you do so. You should also ensure that your accident and details of the cause and the injury are recorded within the employers accident book.

      Reply
  34. Paul

    Hello,
    I had a accident at work which resulted in me having a bulging disc protrusion at L4 L5 which is permanently sat on my sciatic nerve along with a damaged elbow. I had an MRI scan which shows these injuries. My treatment is now ongoing as I’ve been in chronic pain for 10 months.
    I’ve had lumbar spine epidural injection, I’m due a medial block injection to see if this improves my pain and I am currently on a high dosage of gabapentin (600mg 3 times per day) to help manage my pain. If the injections fail to improve my chronic pain then I’ve been instructed that I’ll have to have spinal surgery.

    The accident happened due to my manager giving me one to one training at a clients work shop and instructed me to use the wrong size drums. I should have used a 115 litre drum but used a 205 litre drum. These 205 litre drum when full of dense solution weighs above 300kg, and we are asked to manually transport them to our vehicles. It was the overall weight of the drum that caused my injuries.

    My Manager told me to follow his training and to not deviate at all from it. There was no risk assessment done on me to undertake the job safely.
    I have done basic manual handling modules but I was told to work in the way that suited my Manager.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you were being asked to move an item of 300kg alone, without assistance then your employer has been negligent towards your health and safety and has clearly exposed you to the risk of injury.

      Given your description of the injury and the impact upon you, we would like to look further in to helping you make a claim for personal injury compensation. If you would like to pursue your claim further, please call us on 01225430285 or use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website. Our team can then help you and get your claim presented to our specialist Solicitors in order that it can be assessed properly. Our initial view is that you have a valid claim and one that you have every right to pursue.

      Reply
  35. Suzanne

    i injured my eye on Friday it started bleeding straight away, went to opticians after work i was asked to pay a fee for an ocular scan, should the company reimburse me?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your employer is not obliged to pay your medical costs under UK law. If you are injured in an accident at work and incur costs as a result, you could recover your losses and expenses by pursuing a successful claim for personal injury compensation. In your case, the cost of the scan would be recoverable under your special damages should you succeed with a claim.

      In order to advise you as to whether or not you have a valid claim against your employer for the injury to your eye, we need to know more about the work you were doing and how the accident happened. It would be good for us to have the chance to speak with you for a few minutes so that our team can help you to understand whether or not you can claim. Please call us on 01225430285 or make an online enquiry to get further help.

      Reply
  36. Jordan

    Hi,
    We use a crash decking system on site, I fell through one of the floors as it was not installed properly, i managed to grab myself from falling all the way down but I have hit my hip & leg on the way down but I don’t think anything is broken, however I am struggling to walk normally, where do I stand on this?
    Thanks
    Jordan

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Was your accident recorded in an employers or site accident book? You should seek medical attention for the injuries sustained and ensure that an accurate report of the incident has been made. Once this is done, you could contact us to begin the process of making a claim for compensation. As long as you did not erect the flooring system that was not constructed properly, you should be able to prove negligence and as such, succeed with a claim.

      Reply
  37. Nobodyschild

    My brother had accident at work, climbing out of his rig, he cant remember clearly it happening it was so quick and he was in such pain, resulted in him having both sides his leg opened, as muscles were bleeding, and he could have lost it, he had 30 stitches one side then large skin graft on other side and three or four ops. Then knee was repaired best they could, as it was broken in two places, has been out of work from August till December on Ssp. When they asked if he was fit could he work, and he signed off and worked as they needed money for Christmas. They were off till last week, he started back this am not in his own job, but working manual labour. He’s in agony with these injuries, his leg’s swelling up, can they do this? He has been told he will have to have knee replacement sooner rather than later as original option not worked, health and safety have been in, say cant find why this happened so don’t think he would have claim, he’s lost so much in wages and pain and suffering, and now this today.

    Reply
    • Janet mcgowan

      my daughter sustained a crushing injury to her right hand and degloved some of her forearm which has left her with scarring and loss of use to her fingers. her employer said it was her fault because she did not turn off the machine before trying to unblock a jam or yarn. Is it her fault and can she claim compensation?

      Reply
      • Ian Morris

        There is certainly the right to make a claim and given the severity of the injuries sustained, it would be wise and reasonable to attempt to pursue such action further.

        In this case, the employer will be liable if they have not provided training in the safe use of the machine, specifically with regards to dealing with a machine jam or the need to remove any items blocking the machine or obstructing the process. If your daughter hasn’t had such training, she could succesfully argue that she was not made aware of the risk of injury and the employer had been negligent. Of course, if the employer had provided such training and your daughter ignored that, she may struggle to succeed with a claim. Of course, we must also consider whether she was trained, but if the environment or supervisor on duty pressured her in to ignoring the training or if the employer didn’t have adequate safety guards on the machine in question.

        This is certainly a matter we would like to look in to further and discuss with your daughter. Please call us on 01225403825 or ask us to call if preferred.

        Reply
  38. Chris

    I was manager on shift and fell on the steps where there is a hole in the floor which was covered with leaves etc. We go every morning to turn on our equipment and twisted my ankle and bruised all my footing. I was the first aider on shift and this wasn’t reported at all. I couldn’t walk for 3 days, am I entitled to claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It would appear that the hole that caused you to sustain injury was dangerous and for the employer to leave it in situ is negligent. We would be happy to help you pursue your claim. Ideally, some photographs of the hole in which you twisted your ankle would be really helpful. Can you obtain some?

      Reply
  39. Joan

    I have 2 questions.
    1st. Doing a night shift in an independent living home with one other carer we had a fire which required all emergency services. We found out that the sprinkler system was not working. And also our manager who eventually appeared made us work the rest of shift.

    2nd question.
    Again doing a night shift I received a used needle stick injury which needed hospital treatment. I was not able to go as could not contact anyone as all emergency phone numbers were locked away. I eventually managed to go to the hospital and instead on a prevention injection I had representative hepatitis injection.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The faulty sprinkler system is a very serious issue and should be immediately reported to the employer (in writing). If no repairs are made immediately, you must report the issue to your local authority.

      On the issue of the used needle stick injury, you can pursue a claim for compensation for the stress and anxiety caused by the injury. Please call us on 01225430285 to start your claim.

      Reply
  40. Angel

    Hey . At my job had a confrontation with another employee to a point that I didn’t offend the employee at all or anything bad the only thing that he was drinking at work as well and then that he did the first move to push me so hard that I ended up slipping and falling to the ground . I ended up injured , all my back and couple parts of my body .
    Managers didn’t want to fill up paperwork , or anything what they supposed to do till I spoke up .
    Any suggestions?.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Any injury in the workplace should be recorded in an accident book or accident reporting system. In your case, there should be an investigation in to the conduct of those involved (including yourself) by the employer.

      It would appear that you have grounds to pursue a claim for the injuries you sustained as you appear to be the non-fault party.

      Reply
      • Liam

        In a warehouse. I was asked to do a job that requires a lot of manual lifting, but as someone who has a history of shoulder problems I asked if I could not do it that shift as my shoulder was feeling sore. There’s a lot of other jobs that can be done without me risking my shoulder getting worse and usually it wouldn’t be a problem. There are other employees with health issues who never have to do the heavy lifting jobs as well so didn’t see it as a problem. I had the next week booked off so the supervisor said to me to just do the work and rest it on my week off, I said no so he proceeded to call the manager and report it who then came to me to say id have to get a sick note as they don’t do light duties (even though they do as with the other employees). So I’m now on the sick because of it. They have recently been sacking people for some very suspect reasons and I’ve a feeling they were just being like that to see if they could get rid of me for something. Is there anything I can do? Especially with them trying to make me do the lifting after reporting potential injury?

        Reply
        • Ian Morris

          It would appear that you may need some employment law advice and we would recommend that you make enquiries with a specialist Solicitor in that area. Some advice we can give is that it is vitally important that ANY communication you have with your employer regarding your reporting possible injury and requesting light duties or any feelings you have of unfair treatment should be made in writing in order that evidence is available if needed at a later date. Relying on verbal conversations is unwise and exposes you to an unfair outcome.

          With specific regards to your shoulder injury, if your employer is causing you injury as a result of negligence – lack of training, requiring you to work unsafely and lift items of excessive weight etc, you should record your injury in an accident book at work and contact us to pursue a claim against the employer. You can also call us on 01225430285 if you would like to discuss a possible claim in further detail.

          Employers are not obliged to provide light duties if none are available, although good employers will usually work with employees to reduce the risk of worsening an injury. However, given your employers attitude, if your shoulder situation prevents you from performing the duties that you have been employed to perform, you will either need to be signed off sick or eventually seek alternative employment.

          Reply
  41. Paul

    I badly scolded my leg at work. I was off for around three weeks.
    My company sent me risk assessments to read and said I would be classed as working from home. The accident was not reported to the health and safety executive.
    Is this legal ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      We would always advise that any concerns about the handling of a health and safety incident by an employer be referred to the relevant authorities such as the Health and Safety Executive or RIDDOR.

      Reply
  42. Josef

    I had a work accident. I underwent an open fracture pinky. After 2 months, I return to work. Does the employer have to deal with me and start negotiations, or do I have to apply for a settlement?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      In the UK, the process to get to a settlement agreement with an employer after an accident at work is to instruct a specialist Solicitor to act for you and make a claim on a No Win No Fee basis against the employers insurance cover.

      Please call our team on 01225430285 to start your claim and get some help in this matter.

      Reply
  43. Manwar

    I had an accident at work. I am a security officer and I do security in a office. We had a sainsburys delivery arrive and he had parked further away from normal and was causing traffic. I went out to explain if You can park back here in front of building as that’s where all sainsburys drivers park. I went back and stood at front of the door. He started to reverse back. He reversed too sharp and was coming towards me I tried to stop him as he was going to hit the glass shelter but it was too late – he hit the glass shelter and the glass came crashing down. I was taken to hospital where a CT scan came out all good, but I had suffered from lacerations to the back of my head and arm. Medical staff glued the injuries and I left with heavy dressings upon them.

    When I came home I phoned my security company to say will they be helping me in any compensation against sainsburys. My security company said it has nothing to do with them and that I would have to pursue my own claim. They also said they are not also sure about if I will get full wages. At which they have upset me further. I have had a sick note from my GP to say I can’t go to work for the next 2 weeks. Can You please advice if this was correct from my employer the security company even though accident happened at a site which they look after for security?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you make a claim for compensation will be down to you and is something that you would have to pursue on your own. However, we would be very happy to help you make your claim as you have a valid claim with good prospects of succeeding. Please call us on 01225430285 or email your contact details to me (ian@direct2compensation.co.uk) and I’ll call you to discuss how we can help and what you can claim for, including recovery of any lost wages if your employer don’t pay you whilst you recover from your injuries.

      Your employer is sadly right legally in terms of the fact that they are not the liable party and are therefore not responsible for this incident. The law will not oblige them to pay your usual salary whilst you can’t work and as such, the only way to recover your lost wages is by making a claim for personal injury compensation.

      If the accident was not recorded in the accident book at the place where you were working, it would be wise to see if they would now make a report.

      Please do call us or send your contact number to me as we would be very happy to help you.

      Reply
  44. Harry Morgan

    Hi I cut my finger on a machine at work that someone had left the safety cap off nobody can prove who took the cap off does this matter?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      What matters is whether the employer has a system of inspection in place to ensure that the safety items required are in place and actively working. Given the nature of your injury, providing the laceration is sufficiently serious (required hospital attention or that of a Nurse) we would be happy to look further in to helping you to succeed with a claim for compensation.

      Please call us on 01225430285 or you can ask us to call you when it best suits you.

      Reply
  45. Pedro

    I was injured at work, I had to take time off on SSP. I have been given a return to work, sick note with amended duties. My employer has told me their are no light duties. I must go home and am back on SSP. Is this normal ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer does not have to provide light duties – if no light duties are available, they are with their rights to send you away on SSP until you are fit to work.

      You can recover your lost income by making a claim for work related injury compensation. Please call us on 01225430285 to discuss your accident at work and we can help you find out whether or not you can make a claim for compensation.

      Reply
  46. Jody

    I’m a prison officer. I had a injury after a control and restrain incident, was off from work for three months then went back to work on light duties for few months but now back off work with the injury, awaiting operation to have disc decompressed in spine.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      To find out whether or not our Solicitors can pursue a spinal injury claim for you, please call us on 01225430285. Our team can take details from you regarding the incident, the injuries and how it has impacted your life and then submit a formal enquiry to our Solicitor panel for detailed consideration.

      Reply
  47. Michael

    Hello, I was injured at work, after the injury they had stated I am to have a second man to assist me while I recover and they looked into getting me a back harness to support my back while at work. The back harness was denied, and the second man is only “as and when” one is available. I work as an alarm Engineer so when they cant get me a second man, I am forced to do the job by myself, which then causes me to have to have a half day as the pain is too much to do by myself and if I can only manage a half day this goes unpaid. Is there anything I can do? As they are not helping me recover after the injury.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You can make a claim for the injury sustained at work – if the injury was not caused through your own fault. Please call us on 01225430285 or use our ‘start a claim’ page so that we can find out more and look in to the possibility of our Solicitors pursuing a claim for you on a No Win No Fee basis.

      Reply
  48. Richard

    I slipped on a puddle of oil at work and injured my wrist and ankle. I got it put in the accident report form but my manager filled the form in incorrectly. The manager then told me to sign it the way she had filled it in. I pointed out that it was incorrect but she told me to sign it anyway. I refused and took the form from the table to photocopy it, and the manager snatched it from my hands which hurt my wrist even further and she refused to let me take a photocopy of it!

    I demanded a copy of the incorrectly filled in form and took the form back from her. She is now claiming I assaulted her, and I am now on suspension facing a disciplinary and a probable dismissal.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      We would like to hope that the suspension will end with you returning to work, once the employers realise that your Manager was in the wrong. It is important that you make written representations to them outlining what had happened and comment on being pressurised to sign an accident book report that was inaccurate. That in itself should result in an investigation in to your Managers conduct.

      It is vitally important that an accident book report is accurate, especially from the perspective of the person injured in the accident at work. Therefore you did the right thing in refusing to sign the report when it was not accurate.

      If you would like to make a claim, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  49. Janet

    I work in sales and yesterday I visited a client premises and as I came out of reception to return to my car I slipped on the decking outside.

    i injured my ankle and knee and was taken to A&E as I was unable to walk and both my knee and ankle swelled up immediately.

    Although I reported this to the office immediately as I was due to go into another meeting which I could not attend, not on any occasion did anybody from the company make sure I was OK, ask if I needed any assistance or bother to ask how I was going to get home.

    I arranged for my partner to take time out of work and come and collect me after 5 hrs in A& E. I made a call to the office and asked to speak to my direct line manager (General Manager) to inform his I was on my way home and my car had been left as I was unable to drive.

    His reply was, yes I was told you tried to kill yourself this morning, followed by a ticking off for attending the visit in the first place as the sales value didn’t warrant it, and where had my car been left and was it safe.

    My question is should my employer under the circumstances have been more concerned and offered support. I have been left to retrieve my car which will be a while before I can pick this up, and bearing in mind the locations 1.5 hours away from where I live so a 3 hour all round trip.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      On a moral basis, your employer should certainly have shown more care and support. However, they have not acted incorrectly in terms of law or how they handled the aftermath of your fall. You may however, wish to make a complaint to them as to their lack of support or care for staff injured whilst going about company business.

      As to the nature of your fall, you may have valid grounds to pursue a claim for the injuries you have sustained and any associated loss of income or incurred costs against the business where you fell.

      Reply
  50. Sharon Wills

    I work as a personal assistant in health and social care. I am directly employed by a disabled client who is in receipt of government funding called Direct Payments, meaning that she can interview and employ her own Carers directly. I work part time and I have a contract of employment with a job description.

    My question is that I am constantly asked to complete work that isn’t in my contract of employment or on the job description and It surrounds waking the dog. Last week, due to poor weather conditions plus the dog pulling on the led, I fell down. Although I already have a back problem, this accident has aggravated it and I am now off sick from work. Am I able to claim compensation through loss of earnings?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You may be able to make a claim for the injury caused by performing tasks that you have not been trained to provide or indeed, employed to provide.

      You should make an accident report to your employer and ensure that medical attention is sought for the injuries before contacting us to start your claim. You can call us on 01225430285 or let us know when you would like us to call you.

      Reply
  51. Monika

    I work in a nursery school and I am looking after children between 1.5 to 2 years old. On a daily basis I have to change nappies and as required I have to lift the children on and off of the changing mat. Last week when I was doing my duties and lifting a child, I felt my back click and I was in pain. When I left work, I was in lots of pain.

    I went to the doctor due to the pain and my doctor said that I had slipped a disc. I am in lots of pain and I am going to the doctor again today. I have spoken with my manager regarding my wages for the time that the accident happened and my time off work. She has said that she is not going to pay my salary until I get a sick note from the doctor and if doctor can backdate the sign off to when I was injured, she would then be able to pay me. I would like your advice on this. What am I supposed to do? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should check with your employer whether the Doctors note she has asked for will see her pay your usual salary or statutory sick pay (SSP). Most employers do not pay full salaries to those staff who are off work through illness or injury – even if the injury was caused at work. UK law does not require employers to pay full salaries to employees who are off work unwell or injured. Indeed, most people only receive SSP apart from the more fortunate employees who have a contract that entitles them to a certain period of sick pay.

      Your work clearly involves physical lifting and moving – often known as manual handling – of the children in your care. As such, your employer should ensure that you are properly trained in lifting and moving of the children. If your employer has not provided you with such training, you may have a valid claim for compensation for the serious injury to your spine caused at work. Making a claim for personal injury compensation would enable you to recover any lost income as well as a settlement for the pain and discomfort of the injury you have sustained.

      If you would like further help with this, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  52. Claire

    I had a fall at work which left me unconscious, my manager did not call an ambulance and i was not given first aid, I was then expected to continue at work. I was off for 3 weeks with mild concussion and anxiety. Was I treated fairly?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you were treated fairly is a matter of opinion. The obvious opinion would be that your employer didn’t treat you properly or pay adequate attention to the risks caused to you by such an accident. Losing consciousness as the result of a fall indicates that potentially serious injuries could have been sustained and calling an Ambulance to attend or taking the injured person immediately to A&E in such circumstances would be advisable.

      We would like to know more about your fall and how you came to sustain concussion and anxiety. It is quite likely that you would have a valid claim against your employer in this situation. Our team can help you to identify whether or not you could pursue a claim in this situation and you may therefore want to call us on 01225430285 for some initial guidance. Alternatively, you may prefer to ask us to call you at a time that suits you.

      Reply
      • Claire

        Thank you for answering my question, I had hit my knee as a colleague had called me over, as I proceeded to walk over I collapsed on the floor hitting my head which caused concussion. I’m extremely anxious to go back to work as I feel completely unsupported

        Reply
        • Ian Morris

          You should make sure that your employer is made aware (in writing) as to how you have felt unsupported and that you are now anxious about returning.

          Reply
  53. Dura Bangura

    I work as a train maintenance for a cleaning company. Was entering a train to do my work when I tripped and fell hitting the left side of my face and bruises on my knee. I have been off work since June, only on ssp. Waiting for mri scan in December. Symptoms of pain dizziness and concussion continues to this day. The work shoe I had on was defective and had reported the defect previously and coincidentally on the very day of the accident. The manager did not reply to my request for new foot wear until several weeks later and he stated he will provide a new footwear at my terminal. To this day he has not done so to the best of my knowledge.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As you had already reported a fault with your footwear, the employer may well be liable in this matter. Please call us on 01225430285 so that we can talk further with you regarding your accident and a possible claim for personal injury compensation. Our initial view is that you have a valid claim and we would be happy to investigate this further for you.

      If you would prefer that we call you, please let us know and we’ll be in touch.

      Reply
  54. Kylie

    Is it the employer or the employee’s responsibility to transport the employee to and from Physiotherapy?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It is likely that getting to and from any therapy or medical appointments will be the responsibility of the person receiving the therapy and not that of the employer.

      Reply
  55. Shawn

    I had a quad bike accident at work about 5 weeks ago. I hurt my back and banged my leg and arm. I reported this, but my Boss said there was no accident book as they don’t need one, so I could not fill it in.

    I went to the Doctors after 3 days as my back hurt more and my legs were tingling. I was sent to Hospital and saw a registrar who took x-rays and said it looked like I had some compressed discs and a ‘wedge’ fracture. I told my Boss to send cover and help, but was told “try to find some casual labour”! No help came and I have tried to carry on work in a lot of pain. I have asked again for cover and explained I cannot work properly but have been told he can’t find cover.

    I am a gamekeeper and currently doing 50+ miles on the quad a day which is very painful and as there is no one to help I cannot take time off as the animals need to be fed. I am working 12 hours 7 days a week and not had a day off since June and am sure they can’t treat me like this?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer should be recorded all and any accidents at work and for them to not have a system in place to report incidents is bad practice. Given the severe injuries you have sustained, you really should not be working in the way that you are and in doing so, you are risking your long term health. Of course, you should be following medical advice and if your Doctor is advising rest, you need to rest and the responsibility for the work you do falls with the employer and not you. You may well benefit from seeking some specialist employment law advice regarding your working pattern and the way you are managed by your employer as it does not seem correct that you work 12 hour days, 7 days a week without any time off.

      With regards to your injuries and any possible claim for compensation, you may have grounds to make a claim for compensation. However, we need to know more about the quad bike accident to advise further on that. We would like to know what training (if any) your employer has given you to ride the quad and how the accident happened and what caused you to be thrown from the quad.

      Reply
  56. Helen

    Hi I’m a beauty therapist. I’ve worked for a small business for over two years. I have an issue with my hand and neck due to to many massage and cleaning duties. I’ve raised my concerns to my employer, this goes back from 2017 till today. I’ve been referred to a physiotherapist and she said it looks like repetitive strain injury. She sent me for an Mri and also a nerve conduction test. Still waiting for results my doctor give me a fit note to say I can do other treatments but not massage. But my employer ignored the note and carried on giving me massage and lots of cleaning. After me telling my employer what the outcome could be. I’ve asked could they hire a cleaning service and to balance the work load they said they can’t afford a cleaner. There’s also another member of staff suffering from a similar problem but they don’t get lots of massages and don’t do any cleaning duties but they are a manager. I was then handed a letter to say that the doctors note wasn’t clear in what it meant and that they are a caring company and think it’s best I go on the sick and my column will be cleared and not to return until I get my results. As you can imagine this is financially affecting me and adding to a lot of stress, what can I do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      We could ask our specialist Solicitors to review this situation for you and consider whether or not there is a realistic prospect of succeeding with a claim against your employer for the injuries to your hand and neck caused by your work.

      If you would like to seek the advice and opinion of our specialist Solicitors, please ask us to call you and we’ll be in touch.

      Reply
  57. Amedeo

    Hi, I ruptured a ligament in my knee at work clearing up materials and resulted in having 3 weeks off. I didn’t report it in accident book because I put up with the pain for a few days at work thinking it would just go away. The pain got so severe I saw a docter, got an mri. I have doctors notes and mri results. Can I claim loss of earnings for the 3 weeks ? Thanks

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law, the only way you could make a claim for loss of income would be by making a claim for personal injury compensation against your employers ’employer liability insurance’ cover and succeeding with the same.

      In this case, a claim would succeed if the injury to your knee can be directly attributed to employer negligence. Therefore, if you have not received adequate training by your employer or you were not provided with the right equipment or personal protective equipment (PPE) you may well be able to succeed with a claim and should contact us to take this further.

      Reply
  58. Dave

    Hi, I pulled my back out at work, the company physiotherapist said I’m not fit for work in any form till further reports are done. My work are trying to get me back in already, what do I do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you have been advised by a medical professional that you are not fit to work, you should follow their advice and draw your employers attention to this. If you have a ‘sick note’ from your GP or health professional, you should ensure that your employer has a copy of the same.

      Reply
  59. Tom

    I am a painter and decorator and I have injured myself at work. I have hurt my neck and back by using a treble 15 rung extension ladder constantly for 4 days – extending and pulling down the ladder constantly for short shifts at the top of the ladder, positioning it over roofs and digging holes into the grass so that the ladder was level and safe to use. There was also no scaffold tag on the ladder although I did do my own safety checks. There was not a viable alternative of a mobile electronic working platform which would of been the safer way and quicker way to do the task. Where do I stand?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Employers have a responsibility to ensure that workers are given the correct equipment to enable them to work safely and to ensure that the risk of injury is minimised. In this case, the employer may have failed to meet their obligations, so it could be that you can make a claim for compensation.

      Have you reported the details of your injuries to your employer and sought medical attention? If not, you should do so at the earliest opportunity and you should ensure that the ladder issue is noted.

      We would be interested to know if you had requested the mobile electronic platform to use and if this had been rejected as this could be relevant to any further action.

      At face value, this would appear to be a matter that should be considered by our specialist Solicitors. We would like to take some further information from you so that we can get this to our specialist Solicitors in order that they can liaise with you and advise as to whether or not they can pursue a claim for you.

      Reply
  60. Charlie

    I mashed my finger whilst putting stuff in a skip, my gm did not fill in an accident form, where do I stand?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If your employer hadn’t provided you with safety gloves or ensured that you were trained to work safely (knowing safe lifting weights, using the right equipment etc) or you were injured through someone else’s negligence, you would have a right to make a claim for compensation for the injuries you sustained.

      The lack of an accident book entry would not prevent you from making a claim. However, a completed accident report form does provide useful evidence to support a claim. If your accident at work was recent, you could still attempt to complete an accident report or you could create your own report in writing and send a copy to the employer by email.

      Reply
  61. Steve

    After I’ve reported a accident at work involving myself can you tell me what responsibilities or actions my employer should take once the accident book has been handed in?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Depending on the nature of the accident and the severity of the injury, your employer should take appropriate action.

      If the injuries are of a serious nature, a proper investigation should be conducted and if applicable, the matter should be reported to RIDDOR.

      Reply
  62. Stephen

    My husband’s firm is only paying for one month, he had an accident at work which was not his fault. His elbow is smashed and had to have screws and plates put in it, only just been fixed but his company said they will only pay for July and not August. He will get ssp but clearly the next day after accident a heath and safety officer and his boss told us he would get full pay all the time he is off and slowly getting him back to work as well.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Employers are not obliged by law to pay full pay to injured staff – even if they were injured at work. Therefore, they may well place him on SSP and there will be an associated loss of income.

      Given the serious injury to your Husband’s elbow, we would be keen to know more about the accident that lead to the injury in order to be able to advise him further. He could well have a valid claim against the employer for the serious injury to his elbow and he would therefore also be able to recover all lost income and incurred costs he would have – transport to and from Hospital etc.

      Please call us on 01225430285 or ask us to call you if you prefer so that we can offer more help.

      Reply
  63. Beth Raffle

    I had an accident at work 6 weeks ago while placing my tools into the metal cage provided by my employer, I sliced my finger open, there are areas on the cage which are sharp and there is not enough space to actually fit your hands. I went to hospital and had 25 butterfly stitches and glue, I was then advised by the hospital that i could not return to work for at least 10 days especially as my work involves heavy lifting. I reached out to my company to assist as I was worried about monetary deductions from my wage, I was told it doesn’t matter why I was off work I would not receive any monetary assistance. Today I have received an investigation report into the matter, 6 weeks after the incident, I had also not been informed they were investigating, stating that the reason for the accident was because I was rushing and there are no sharp edges on the cages. I have photographic evidence of the sharp edges and am shocked I am being blamed for this accident. Is there anything I can do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You can make a claim for compensation to seek damages for your injuries and any associated losses caused by your employers negligence.

      Reply
  64. Frankie

    I was victim to an armed robbery incident while being on duty at work and would like to know How can I start processing my claim?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the incident in which you were injured was a criminal act, you may be able to make a claim via the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) scheme. To qualify for the scheme, you must make your claim within 2 years of the criminal incident and you must cooperate fully with the Police during their investigations – providing statements, pressing charges if asked etc. You must also have received medical treatment for your injuries – including psychological injuries such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

      You can make a claim directly to the CICA via their own website and you do not need to instruct a Solicitor. However, you may prefer to have your claim professionally managed by a specialist Solicitor to ensure that your rights are enforced and protected. If you would like to make a claim with a Solicitor, please call us so that we can help you start your claim.

      Reply
  65. Colin

    I work for a UK airline and regularly get sent for a week at a time to Europe and North Africa. What responsibilities does my employer have regarding accidents and health, access to doctors etc whilst not in the UK. So far my employer simply states ‘get your own travel insurance’ which is rather insulting and debatable that any meaningful cover would be gained when I am not actually travelling but sent to work.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your employer would have responsibility for your health and safety whilst at work, but when you are ‘recovering’ and resting overnight etc, you would have responsibility for your own safety and well-being.

      Regarding what insurance cover the employer should provide you for medical expenses etc, you should make enquiries with an employment law Solicitor to discuss these issues.

      Reply
  66. John Martin Roberts

    I have had an accident in work I’ve broke my left arm and shattered my left elbow when I was delivering parcels. I have never had any Health & Safety training before the accident. The company I work for has admitted that they cant find any documents to say that I have had Health and safety training. Can I make a claim against my employer?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If your employer cannot demonstrate that they have provided you with the required health and safety training and ensured that you can work as safely as possible, it may be possible to demonstrate employer negligence and succeed with a claim for compensation as a result of the injury you have sustained to your arm at work.

      On the basis of my initial view of your situation, it would appear that you could well have a valid claim for compensation. Please call us on 01225430285 or you can request a call back.

      Reply
  67. Joe

    I’ve had a back injury in work 4days ago. I have not yet filled out an incident report. At time of injury I didn’t feel I was after doing much damage. So I didn’t fill out form. Continued to work my shift out. Last four days injury has gotten worse and cannot return to work. How long do I have to report this injury?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should report your injury at the earliest opportunity and really should have done so already. If you haven’t yet reported the workplace injury in the employers accident book or reporting system, you should now do so immediately.

      Reply
  68. Sarah jane sylvia

    Hi, using a sander at work, since this have a lot of HAVS symptoms. Been seen by various doctors, had MRI, results should be in monday.
    Colleague stated one of management said the tools haven’t been serviced since 2002! Had HAVS training not long after the incident.
    Been on light duties for 10 weeks. And have been signed off by doctor for another 6 weeks. Have appointment with plastic surgeon in DECEMBER!
    Been called to a meeting at work Tuesday 16th july to discuss ‘well being and if there are enough light duties’.
    Thinking going to be told not enough light duties to continue going in to work! Therefore will be on reduced/sick pay. (Wont be able to pay rent and bills etc.)
    Can the company do this?
    If putting in claim should the process start now or best to wait till results of MRI are through?
    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you are medically unfit to work, the employer can review as to whether or not their are other suitable (light) duties for you to work. If they do not have such available tasks, they are within their rights to put you on sick leave.

      With regards to your HAVS symptoms, once you have had the MRI diagnosis, it would be sensible to start your claim. Given the employer only provided training after the onset of your symptoms, you could well be in with a good prospect of succeeding with any claim for compensation.

      We work with expert specialist HAVS solicitors and can help you. Once you’ve had your MRI results, please call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  69. Maria

    Hi,

    I burnt my hand at work about a month ago. A minor burn but I took a day off before going back to work. My employer took an absent day off my pay for that. Can he do this? Even though I injured myself at work?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      UK law does not require an employer to pay full salary to staff who are off work as a result of an injury caused at work. The only way to recover lost income after taking time off due to a workplace injury is to succeed with a claim for accident at work compensation and recover lost income or incurred costs through the special damages element of the claim.

      To make a claim, the accident needs to be caused through negligence – a lack of training, insufficient or inadequate equipment or due to someone elses actions. You also need to have injuries of a certain severity – something you can read more about in this article.

      Reply
  70. Christine

    I had a fall at work which resulted in me hitting my face (causing concussion and scaring and also permanent muscle damage). I also have tennis elbow. I took pictures, when I fell down the step there was no hazard tape, just black tape covering the step. I took pictures and have no found out they have put hazard tape on the step. Where do I stand because they are saying there was hazard tape down but my pictures state otherwise?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your photographs that show that hazard tape was not applied before your fall could well be strong supporting evidence for a claim for compensation. Given that you have this evidence, it is worth taking this matter further and letting our specialist Solicitors look in to this for you.

      Reply
    • Martin

      I’ve returned to work from long term sick due to an accident at work, I’m on amended duties can the employer force me back on the sick if they cant find me any work?

      Reply
      • Ian Morris

        Employers must follow employment law and due process when dealing with staff with health issues that impact on their ability to work. An employer can’t simply dismiss an employee for being unfit to work, unless they are deemed to be unlikely to be fit for a considerable period of time. In your case, an employer does not HAVE to provide light duties, but they should consider whether or not such duties are available. If not, they can place you on sickness leave.

        Reply
  71. Matt

    I had an accident in 2017 where I injured my groin against some equipment in the back of my work van, although at the time as there was no obvious injury other that a few moments of pain, it didn’t go in the accident report as I say there was no obvious injury, but over the last 18 months it has been uncomfortable, it appears I have a hernia which my doctor has recorded as an industrial injury. Does my employer have to pay me for being off work after the operation?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law, your employer does not have to pay you whilst you are recovering from surgery and unable to work – even if the injury was work related. Sadly, the only legal requirement on the employer is to provide statutory sick pay (SSP), unless your contract with them affords you a better benefit. Some employers choose to pay staff sick pay for a period of time, others follow the law and do not.

      In your case, the only options open to you if the employer is to choose to not pay your usual salary would be to use your paid holiday allowance or to seek to recover any lost pay by way of making a claim for compensation as a result of your workplace injury. However, given the lack of accident book entry the employers insurance are likely to fight any claim strongly and put the ball in to your court with regards to proving that the injury happened at work and due to their negligence.

      Reply
  72. Lee

    Hi cut my hand at work when I was doing high level work on ladder, as I was pulling down the second run on the ladder the first run slid down at speed my immediate reaction was to reach up toward the ladder the foot of the ladder
    Hit my hand and left a big gash in my hand I notfity my company via email but I had no response from them i had to have few days of I am self employed , so don’t know where I stand on this I have photo and proof of email sent when I was unable to intend work but again no respond from the work place .

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Although you were self-employed, you may have rights to make a claim for compensation against whoever had contracted you. If the ladder is your own, you would probably have your own responsibility for ensuring it was fit for purpose and safe to use (and that you were trained in using it safely). However, if the ladder belongs to a main contractor you could take this further (possibly!).

      Reply
  73. Charlotte

    I burnt my hand on hot oil at work (I will admit that was my fault) but I wasn’t allowed to leave work to get treatment, nor allowed a break to go and get myself treated, even when I made myself clear that I intended to get treatment during my break. I had to remind management to write the incident in the accident book before I finished my shift, and went to a and e 8 hours after my accident occoured. Where would I stand on this?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the cause of the initial injury was your own fault, you can’t seek to claim compensation for the injury – even if the employer delayed you from getting access to medical treatment. You should however, take out a grievance against the employer for refusing you to leave for medical attention as that is not acceptable.

      Whilst you state that the injury was your fault, you could be undermining your own position. You should ask yourself whether your employer had correctly and sufficiently trained you in your work and whether they had provided the correct equipment and clothing etc to enable you to work safely. If you are unsure in anyway about who is at fault for your burn injury and whether or not you can make a claim for compensation after being burned at work, please use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website to make further contact with us. We know your rights and can ascertain whether or not your employer has fulfilled their obligations towards your health and safety at work and if we find that the employer has failed you, we’ll help you to pursue a No Win No Fee claim for compensation.

      Reply
  74. Jason

    I recently had a accident at work that resulted in a pulled shoulder. After the accident I was in quite a bit of pain. I had a ultrasound scan and they also discovered that I suffer from bursitis which has also stopped me from returning back to work at this time. Anything I can do about this?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Bursitis is often associated with repetitive strains and it could well be that your work caused that issue and the recent ‘accident at work’ has exacerbated that condition and caused additional soft tissue trauma.

      You have a right to claim compensation from your employer if they have caused your injuries or symptoms. Of course, in your case we don’t yet know what work you do and what your employer failed to do or did that they should not have done that could lead to a successful claim. However, we would like to investigate your situation with a view to pursuing a claim for compensation for you.

      Reply
  75. Susan

    My line manager purchased a rubber sleeve to fit over the pan handle when cooking, this slipped off and the contents of the pan burnt my foot. The company was not aware that the line manager had brought the rubber sleeve into the workplace, all staff at the site knew that the rubber sleeve could slip and slide so who is responsible ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The line manager has clearly made a decision off their own bat and apparently caused a risk of injury to you. In this case, the employer carries an overall responsibility and any claim would be made against them. This is something we would be happy to help you pursue. Please use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website to make further contact with us and we’ll look in to this matter for you.

      Reply
  76. Kyle

    Hello,

    I have recently been involved in a serious fall down into the cellar at work due to a faulty ladder, I’ve was initially off for two weeks but upon returning to the doctor I was booked off for a further week as my recovery was not satisfactory.
    I was paid the first two weeks in full but for the third week I have only been paid statutory pay without being notified that I would not receive full pay.

    Should the company not be paying me out in full for the duration of my recuperation?

    This has now put me in a bit of a financial situation not to mention the added stress ontop of the injury and now worrying about my finances.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      UK law does not require your employer to pay your usual salary whilst you are off work, indeed you are only entitled to SSP unless you have a specific contractual arrangement that entitles you to sickness pay.

      Losing income as a result of being off work due to an injury sustained in a non-fault accident is one of the biggest motivating factors in people looking to pursue a claim for personal injury compensation. In your case, if you make a claim for compensation against your employers liability insurance cover (something all UK employers are obliged to have in place), you could recover compensation for the injuries you have sustained but importantly you could also recover ALL lost income – both previously and any future loss of income if relevant and costs for medical or rehabilitation therapies.

      You describe a ladder accident at work that would lead me to give an initial view that you have a valid claim for compensation and that you should seriously consider making such a claim via our No Win No Fee service. Please call us on 01225430285 or use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website to take your claim further.

      Reply
  77. Ian Morris

    Given that you were not injured whilst in the UK, UK personal injury law will not apply to your situation. As such, we cannot advise you.

    I would strongly suggest that you make contact with specialist Personal Injury lawyers in Florida (and possibly also the Bahamas) to discuss your rights with them.

    Reply
  78. Wayne

    I had an accident at work where my foot slipped on a bit of debris plastic then my leg going under a trolley I was pulling. My leg went one way and my body went another resulting in my knee being locked. I’ve tried to go back to work but my knee keeps locking so I’ve had to take time off while the injured knee is investigated via scans. While I’ve been off my employer has not been in contact and payed me minimal sick pay. It has been put in the accident book and they have installed a cover to stop anymore plastic debris coming from the machine.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Having taken your description of your accident at work at face value, my initial view is that you have a strong claim for accident at work compensation. Whilst your employer has paid minimal sick pay, that is their legal right. Indeed, the only way you can recover lost income after an accident at work in the UK is by succeeding with a claim for compensation against the employers insurance cover. At Direct2Compensation we are experts in accident at work compensation and would like to help you pursue a No Win No Fee claim for compensation. Please use the ‘start a claim’ option on our website to make further contact with us and we’ll then pursue this matter for you.

      Reply
  79. Janine chandler

    I had an accident at work yesterday , we work on aisles in a warehouse where there is racking at both sides with A4 boxes 5 high filled with heavy files, an employee in the next isle was on steps on top shelf and ended up pushing the box to far and it came tumbling down on top of my head. Went to tell supervisor and first aides came and I ended up at the hospital for CR scan which came out ok. Was sick twice in the night got up to go to work but my head was banging phoned work told me to go doctors. Doctor gave me sick note for a week and said not to go in work. I work for an agency and they said I will not get paid for the first 3 days then I will get SSP. It was their fault and I thought I would still get full pay but they said no. Can you advise?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You have a valid claim for compensation. The fact that boxes can be pushed over the edge of racking from the other side would indicate that there are insufficient safety measures in place at the workplace. In fact, we deal with quite a lot of injury claims due to falling objects.

      Your employer is correct in that they don’t have to pay you your salary. As such, we could help you recover compensation for the injuries you have suffered and also recover all lost income caused by the accident at work. Please use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website to get your claim for compensation and loss of income recovery started.

      Reply
  80. Fiona

    i work nights at a supermarket filling shelves. the heavy lifting to get things on the top shelves which are above head height have caused me to be diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome in both wrists and tennis elbow in both elbows. what rights do i have? i am on light duties but to be honest even these are causing me pain in my wrists and elbows. i am worried about losing my job.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You can claim compensation for repetitive strain injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome if it can be shown that the condition has been caused by employer negligence. In your case, you have been diagnosed and are receiving treatment. As such it may be possible to claim compensation for the symptoms you are suffering with. Please use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website and we’ll then be able to help you further.

      Reply
  81. Marie Mcjury

    I had to move stock in heavy cages around the store on my own for four days a few weeks ago. I have really hurt my shoulder and am still attending work and desperately trying to get a doctors appointment. I am a small 50 year old woman and have told my boss about the pain I’m in and my inability to perform the normal tasks I do and that it’s unnacceptable that I was expected to move the cages on my own. Even though they’re ok with reduced tasks at present they are not taking responsibility. I didn’t put it in the accident book as it wasn’t an accident as such, but I have damaged my shoulder somehow. I just need to know what my right are please

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It would be wise to make sure that your verbal discussion with your Manager about the injury and it happening through moving heavy cages alone at work is also made in writing. Having a written record of any work related injury is an important way to protect your interests going forward. In your case, you would not have been immediately aware of the injury and most likely felt it after a few days of such work and this would explain why you felt no need to make an accident book entry. Therefore at this stage, we would recommend that you do record the details.

      With regards to a possible claim, you certainly can attempt to pursue one and we would be happy to assist you on a No Win No Fee basis. Whether or not your claim would succeed would depend on the weight of the cages and what training you have been given by your employer in safe lifting and working safely with items of weight.

      If you would like to take this further, please use the ‘start a claim’ page of our website and we can then call you to discuss your situation and offer you detailed advice regarding this situation.

      Reply
  82. Terry

    I’ve asked for a copy of my accident report, does my employer have to give this to me?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Technically UK employers should provide a copy of an accident book, but there are no specific regulations to enforce this. However a lot of employers and companies will decline to provide a copy of an accident book report. There is nothing in the Health & Safety handbook about reporting accidents which says they must disclose a copy of a report to an employee just that records must (should) be kept of any accident at work.

      Reply
  83. Jason

    My friend has had a op on her in grown toe nail and she’s unable to put a shoe on her employer has told he she has to go in regardless and said to go in with just a sock and she works in a bar and kitchen can she take this further ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer can request attendance at work, but given the nature of the ‘injury’ and type of work, it is not really appropriate for her to work behind a bar without shoes on. Clearly, the risk of damaging the toe further or getting infection is increased by working without appropriate footwear. The best course of action would be for her to seek a Doctors note to provide a period of 7 days as signed off work due to medical reasons.

      Reply
  84. Jonathan

    I was working at work and I’ve stepped out of the van and onto the edge of a pothole, gone over and tore a tendon. The manager rushed me to hospital as I could stand on it and it was huge, now they’re saying the hole wasn’t big enough but I went to work the following day and they had filled it in. I had a company looking into this but they’re not contacting me now. I’ve suffered a lot from this and I’m sure they are responsible.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Do you have any photographs of the offending pothole? If so, it could well make all the difference in any possible claim for compensation.

      Reply
  85. Kasia

    Hi, I got a question about travel to the hospital. Is that allowed that injured person is taken to the hospital by spouse working in the same company? Or an employer should provide a transport? Are there any regulations on it? Thank you in advance. Kasia

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law there are no regulations regarding who should take someone to a Hospital. Employers would have a responsibility to ensure that they do not obstruct medical access, but whether the injured person attends hospital by way of an Ambulance, the employer driving them or a friend, relative or spouse taking them is a matter for the individuals to decide.

      Reply
      • Kasia

        Thank you for a quick response.

        Reply
  86. Petr Sulek

    Hi. I fell from a stepladder, falling 7 feet. Paramedics were called and diagnosed a sprained ankle. I was left walking on it in pain with elbow crutches. My GP was not able to give me an appointment so I was diagnosed on the phone by them also saying I had sprained the ankle and was advised to cool it with ice packs. I went to A&E where an x-ray confirmed a complicated spiral fracture to the tibia, ankle bone and joints. Due to the injury, Surgery was recommended.

    I was seen by a Doctor a few days later, but their opinion was not to operate and to leave it to heal it in a cast for 6 weeks. I am currently off work and thinking what else will come! I need to mention that the stepladder was one year old equipment left by a wedding guest who used it as table plan. It was fully functional and big enough to use it when drapes were required in function room and the managers were ok with it – until now and they have put the stepladder in the bin and left me on the sofa with broken bones!

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Given your injury, it would be sensible and fair to make a claim for compensation against your employer. As you were expected to work at height, the employer needs to have provided the correct training for ladder use and also to adequately risk assess the work and provide safe and secure equipment to enable you to work safely.

      We would be very happy to pursue your claim with our specialist personal injury Solicitors and look forward to speaking with you.

      Reply
  87. Chris

    If I’ve had a accident at work and the injury is ongoing and after my employer sends me to an occupational health advisor and is suggested that it would be unsafe for me to return to work and my employer decides to dismiss me from my job what am I entitled to?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      In the scenario you describe, your options to seek some redress or compensation for the implications of this to your future is to pursue a claim for personal injury compensation. As you were injured in an accident at work, you can make a claim for accident at work compensation if the cause of your accident rests with employer negligence or the negligence of someone else.

      If your injuries are such that you are unable to continue with the work you have previously undertaken, the value of your compensation settlement will include a sum for the severity of the injuries and also recovery of all lost income, including future loss of income.

      It would be wise for us to speak with you regarding your accident at work so that we can ascertain whether or not you could pursue a claim against your employer. Please use the ‘start a claim’ function on our website to make further contact with us, or call our expert staff for help.

      Reply
  88. Diane

    Hi I recently had an accident at work, where the forklift driver pushed a big stil full of metal parts. And it crushed me againist a drill bench, I worked the remaining part of the week and the following week, even though I was in a lost of pain, and very distressed as they recently laid my partner off work, so financially I felt obliged to work. I’ve now been to the hospital, and be diagnosed with fractured coccyx so I’m currently off work with serious pain and limited movement. Do I have grounds for a compensation claim, as I feel it was there fault, and there wasn’t any safety involved? Many thanks.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You definitely have a valid claim in this matter. For the forklift driver to knock an item over and push it in to you indicates that they have made a mistake. As such, you have every right to make a claim.

      Please call us on 01225430285 or use our ‘start a claim’ page to get the ball rolling. We can pursue a No Win No Fee claim for you to recover compensation for your painful injury and also ensure that if successful, you will recover all lost income and incurred costs caused by this accident at work.

      We look forward to helping you make your claim for compensation.

      Reply
  89. Diane

    Serious injury on Wed 3 fractures to shoulder, scapula actually broke off arm. Employer wants me to return to work to answer phone. I am unable to dress myself, plus taking narcotics. ER doc advised me to see an ortho doctor. Company refused. They want their little clinic to sign off on return to work, i am in serious pain and need help.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should speak to the employer to explain that the pain and discomfort is too much to enable you to work and if your Doctor says you cannot work, you should not work.

      Reply
  90. David

    I work for a car garage as a valet and am supplied with a pressure washer and vacume to do my job however it has recently come to my attention that the vacume is not designed for outdoor use (I have no shelter in which to do my work) so gets wet from rain and spray from the pressure washer. My employer wouldn’t pay for a proper one if I asked so thought I would ask on here to see if there was anything I could do if I ended up getting a shock from the equipment.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Electric shocks from work equipment should not happen and employers are obliged to do all they can to minimise the risk of such injuries. To this end, it is imperative that an employer ensures that only the correct electrical equipment is used for the right work and in the right circumstances. Further, an employer must ensure that electrical equipment is safe to use and regularly checked for any possible faults.

      In your case, your employer is putting you at risk of an electrical shock injury and you do need to put them on notice of this possibility by informing them that the electrical equipment you are asked to use is getting wet. You should do so in writing and then it is on record that such a report of a possible hazard has been made.

      Of course, should you then go on to sustain an electrical shock whilst working due to employer negligence, you could use our ‘start a claim’ page to pursue your legal right in making a claim for compensation.

      Reply
  91. dezi

    I was injured at work and put on light duty. Then I was re-injured while on light duty because my supervisor had me do something outside of my restrictions. Shouldn’t my job be help responsible for this? They are now trying to put me out with a medical qualification.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As you were injured at work, your first consideration should be whether you can hold them responsible for your injuries and if so, pursue a claim for compensation. Under UK law, employers have a legal obligation under the Health and Safety at Work Act to provide a safe environment for workers and to ensure that the risks of injury are minimised as far as practically possible.

      In your case, you need to consider how you were injured at work and whether or not you can hold your employer liable for the incident that lead to your injuries. Perhaps your employer has been negligent and not provided sufficient training, support or failed to provide the correct equipment needed to enable you to work safely?

      Under UK law, if you can successfully pursue a claim for compensation for the first injury and possibly for the subsequent worsening of that injury whilst on light duties, you would potentially be able to recover a considerable settlement as it seems as if you are no longer fit to work and would be able to recover future loss of income as a result.

      Reply
  92. Stalin

    l am a parking marshall and was hit by a car whilst on duty leading to a fracture. I was operated on and have a plate inserted in to my leg.

    My employer took assistance of all my medical bills but are now refusing to sign my accidental workers compensation form. They claim they are the ones who payed my bills so the compensation should be awarded to them! Is this possible? I understand they know nothing concerning this and can they be a life time compensation since this is a permanent injury?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your employer maybe entitled to recover some of the costs that they have paid, but they would not be entitled to keep any element of compensation made towards you for the injury you have sustained and any future repercussions associated with that.

      Reply
  93. Trevor Burgess

    I am a window fitter and have recently snapped the main tendon in my arm. I have had an operation to re attach the tendon but will be off work for up to 20 weeks. The window was to heavy for one person but was told there wasn’t anyone to help lift it. I am employed and would normally get statutory sick pay. Due to the circumstances should I be paid full pay whilst I am off?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The scenario you describe would indicate employer negligence as the window you were tasked with lifting was too heavy for safe lifting and your employer should not have expected you to lift it alone without assistance. As such, you should consider making a claim for accident at work compensation – something we are more than happy to help you with – as you have a strong prospect of succeeding with a claim in this case.

      Unfortunately, UK law does not require an employer to pay an injured or unwell employee their usual salary whilst they are off work – even if the injury or illness was caused by employer negligence. As such, most employers simply place absent staff on to statutory sick pay (SSP) whilst they are absent, causing a considerable loss of income.

      To this end, your only legal way of recovering your loss of income is to pursue a claim for compensation against your employer. If you would like to discuss this further or wish to make a claim, please use our website to request that we call you at a time that suits you or you could call us on 01225430285.

      Reply
  94. Csaba

    Hello Ian, I’ve suffered a work accident where both parties me and my employer could be blamed. As an outcome I have a torn ligament in my right forearm. I’ve returned to work within 4 days after the incident. Have been working since however I am in constant pain. I was repeatedly asking for any sort of medical help possible from my company. Not much luck. Only a signed form been sent to occupational health. My employer seems to leave me absolutely alone with my struggles. I don’t want to use my ‘sick pay’ in case of an event of surgery I am facing (according to the muscle specialist report). What am I supposed to do in this situation?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer is not liable to provide any medical help as that will be provided by the NHS or your own privately funded medical professional. The employer must allow you to seek any relevant medical attention and attend any prescribed courses of treatment or therapy sessions.

      Reply
  95. Johana Montez

    My mother was injured at a nursing home by a patient. Took a blow to the knees. She reported it immediately and asked to get sent to see a doctor. They refused to send her and she asked again same day because she had no health insurance. They said no and made her sign a paper that supposedly said they are not sending her. Turned out the paper said she refused to go to the doctor. She is in pain every day and had to quit the strenuous job. Can she do anything about it?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If the care home have failed to adequately protect your Mother and other residents from the risk of injury by a fellow patient with a known history of aggression she could seek to make a claim against the care home on a breach of duty.

      Reply
  96. Ian Morris

    Thank you for the positive feedback. We have worked hard to make sure that our personal injury compensation website offers a valuable resource for people in your position.

    If you have any further need for help, or would like to discuss your claim with our expert staff, please do not hesitate to call us on 01225430285.

    Reply
  97. Clive Hobbs

    Can an employer force an employee to go to hospital following an accident? Is it just a case of recording that advice was provided and refused, and that if necessary the employee was removed from duties for that day?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Nobody can force any person to go to Hospital. Of course, an employer can recommend that an employee should go to Hospital and they should record the details of any such conversations within the accident book record taken regarding the actual accident.

      An employer does have an obligation to make sure that any person who is injured and not fit to be at work is not at work.

      Reply
  98. Mike Rose

    Hi I had a industrial injury at work and as a result injured my shoulder . My employer allowed me to work an alternative role which I have been doing for several years . They are now re appraising the role and saying unless I can go back and work in my old role , I will have to take a large pay cut . Can they do this ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Although you were injured in an accident at work, the issue you now have is no longer a personal injury matter but requires the advice of an employment law specialist.

      Reply
  99. S. Johnston

    I have suffered sciatica due to the lifting of bags that must weigh three or four stone repeatedly whilst at work. One of the main problems is the height that the bags need to be lifted to put in the communal bin. I drive a dustcart and my job description is loader/driver.

    I needed four weeks off work and then went back and told my boss that I needed light duties as I still haven’t recovered and that I won’t be able to do bin lift for a while. However, I was put back on bin lift on my first day back. I am refusing to lift/push or pull anything but they keep telling me I have to get out and help, I gave my notice out of anger and now they won’t let me retract it. They are trying to force me to do the work that caused my siatica in the first place. Does my employer have no responsibility to give me lighter duties?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Employers are not obliged to provide light duties, but they must see if there are such light duties available. If there are not light duties available, the employer should allow you to remain on sick leave until you are deemed fit to work (unless a sufficient period of ‘sickness’ has passed and you are still not fit to return in which case they could seek to terminate employment on the grounds of ill health).

      If your case, the way your employer is tasking you with lifting heavy items may be in breach of safe lifting requirements and even if you had received manual handling training, you may not be able to follow such training due to the working environments and methods of operation and cannot therefore lift safely. As such, you are likely to have a valid claim for work accident compensation.

      Why not speak with us for further advice about your situation as you may well have a valid claim. If you would like some further help, please call us or use our ‘start a claim’ page and we can call you to offer advice, support and if applicable, start your claim for compensation.

      Reply
  100. Rachel soopparayen

    I got injured at work. A works driver took me to the hospital but no one accompanied me and the driver left me there without anyone to look after me. I was in a wheelchair. Is this right?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      In UK law, there is no legal obligation for an employer to accompany an injured worker to Hospital and stay with them at the Hospital, so unfortunately it is ‘ok’ for an employer to do this. However, you would have thought that it was reasonable to expect the employer to make sure that their injured worker was ok and that it would be sensible and the right thing to do for someone to remain with the injured person.

      Reply
  101. Larry

    I have been a postal worker for 10 years and have had a bad back for 8. It has recently got so bad that i am now off work and have been for 6 weeks. It is not from a particular incident, just years of carrying heavy bags. There appears to be no occupational therapy and no help with physio and the union are being useless. I am desperate to get back to work but am getting no help. They just make threatening phone calls. Are Royal Mail obliged to help with my treatment or at least refer me to an OT? Would I have a claim for a low level long term injury?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer ought to be referring you to an occupational therapist on the basis that you are alleging that your injury/pain is being caused by the nature and conditions of your work. You should contact the HR department to pursue this further.

      With regards to a claim against the employer, you could struggle here as there is a strict time limit relating to make a claim. In answer to ‘how long have I got to make a claim’ the answer is 3-years and the 3-year limitation date starts on the date of an accident or the date at which you became aware of an injury. As you have been suffering with symptoms for 8 years or so, this could present problems in your case.

      Reply
      • Larry

        Thanks so much. Really helpful. I will keep on at HR.

        Reply
  102. David

    I recently had an accident at work. I slipped on a loose / poorly fitted drain cover. I have submitted a personal injury claim as a result. i was paid in full for the time I was away from work recovering from my injury. After my employer found out about the claim, there has been the suggestion of not paying me my full wage and I get the impression that they want me to withdraw my claim and are very subtly trying to get me to do so. This is making me feel like they are using this against me and has all the hallmarks of seeds sown in a constructive dismissal. What is your view on this ?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If your employer paid you in full whilst you recovered from the injuries sustained in your accident at work, that is a good thing. The fact that you received pay in full would indicate that your contract with them entitles you to such arrangements. If this is the case, they cannot seek to recover that from you at a later date. They can however reach a time where they no longer have to pay you your full salary if you are unable to work due to your injuries. There is no legal obligation for an employer to pay full salary to employees who are unable to work through illness or injury – even if that injury was suffered in an accident at work. The standard practice is for workers to be placed on to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP). In such cases, a worker can seek to reclaim their loss of income by way of making a claim for accident at work compensation and if successful, recovering lost income and costs through a special damages part of her claim. Whilst it can make it hard for staff having to cope with a loss of wages after an accident at work, at least they do have the right to seek to reclaim them during the claims process.

      You must remember that you have a legal right to make a claim for compensation against your employer if your injuries were caused by the negligence of your employer. As your claim is progressing and being pursued it would appear that you have a valid claim and as such, your employer has no right to pressurise you in to dropping the claim and making you feel guilty about exercising your legal right to seek a settlement award to cover your injuries.

      It is common for people claiming compensation against an employer to feel anxious and concerned about how their claim may affect their employer. With this in mind, it is understandable that you feel vulnerable and it is likely that your concerns are unfounded. However, if you have genuine concerns that your employer is trying to force you out you should seek legal advice from an employment law specialist at the earliest opportunity. You should also raise your concerns with the HR department of the employer.

      Reply
      • Dave

        Thanks for the info. Really helpful.

        Reply
  103. Colin Bayley

    Had an accident at work may 2016 lifting boxes on to a loading bay, felt as though my arm had dislocated, reported to my boss who recorded the incident. After physio and painkillers was sent to a orthopaedic specialist, after more painkillers (injections) it was decided a shoulder replacement was needed as a last resort for quality of life and hopefully pain free mobility. Am currently off sick, but my boss has said my sick pay will end this month. I am not allowed to drive till the end of november and then not sure if I will be allowed to lift, push or pull boxes about so may have to be on amended duties. Does he have to pay full sick pay till the doctor say I can return to work or can he put me on ssp?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Unfortunately, your Employer has no legal requirement to pay you your usual full income if you are unable to work – even if the reason for your inability to work is that of a workplace injury. Therefore, your employer is acting legally in putting you on to SSP (as long as your contract does not state that you receive full salary even whilst sick for as long as you are off – which is unlikely).

      Dealing with a loss of wages due to an absence from work is a big problem for many people who are off work due to an injury or accident at work. Sadly, the only way to recover any lost income caused through an absence at work is to succeed with a claim for compensation. In your case, you could possibly pursue a claim against your employer but you would need to be able to identify an area of employer negligence to succeed. With regards to your injury, it would appear to have been caused by a repetitive strain rather than a one-off single incident. With this in mind, you may have grounds to pursue a claim against your employer if they failed to provide you with manual handling training, the correct tools to ensure that you could work safely or adequate breaks and rest periods.

      Reply
  104. Stephen Hamilton

    Hi. I had an accident at work recently on the table saw at work. I lost the top half of my thumb (which could not be saved) and sawed down through the lower part of the thumb into the knuckle which got that joins the palm ( this knuckle was also destroyed). I’ve had plastic surgery and they’ve done good job- but even if it recovers well, I’ll be left with a short disfigured thumb that won’t move. I’m wondering whether I should claim? The saw should have a guard on but hasn’t for at least the last 10 years, they haven’t been serviced either in that time….there are jobs that we cannot do with the guard on so we leave it off. Nobody has ever told us to put it back on even though I know it should be on. I felt it was all my fault as there is a push stick I could have used and a guard I could have put on-but I didn’t. I love where I work, have a good relationship with the boss, and I don’t want to land them in so much trouble that they have to shut down, but I look at my injury and feel like I want compensation for it.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your attitude towards your employer is laudable and it is good to hear that you like your workplace and get on well with colleagues and Management. However, you have suffered a horrendous injury and lost part of your thumb and the use of a vital part of your grip strength and dexterity. You mention that you feel partly responsible for this accident, but in my view you should not. The very fact that a safety guard has been removed by the employer and that the employer has turned a blind eye to this rather than doing the right thing and ensuring that the guard is on and that a machine capable of doing the work safely was purchased is a prime example of employer negligence.

      My view is that you do have a viable and valid claim for accident at work compensation and you should not be concerned that any claim would cause your employer to close down. The process does not work that way. Any claim would be made against your employers insurance cover and whilst they may have a small excess to pay on any claim against them, it would not unduly damage the business.

      Given the severity of your injuries, I would strongly recommend that you make a claim for compensation. You have lost part of your thumb and the use of the remainder of your thumb. This could greatly affect your ability to work in the future and you should bear that in mind as that could be very relevant in any claim for compensation that you opt to make, with settlement values for serious thumb injuries being quite high.

      Reply
      • Stephen Hamilton

        Thank you for getting back to me so promptly. The guard wasn’t removed by the employer, it will have been removed by one of the workers, could even have been me, but it’s over 10 years ago so it’s difficult to say who. Would this make a difference to a claim? I feel sorry for my employer as she only bought the business 2 years ago as an investment when my old boss was retiring and selling up. She has bought a business that has fallen well behind with health and safety I feel. It’s in my interest that the company continues too as I’m hoping to return as I’ve been there for almost 30 years.

        Reply
        • Ian Morris

          It really doesn’t matter who removed the guard, the fact that the employer has failed to ensure that health and safety regulations are adhered to would indicate that they have been negligent in that respect.

          I appreciate that you feel sorry for the business, but it is not your responsibility to bear responsibility for their health and safety failures. The choice as to whether or not you should make a claim for compensation rests with you and you alone. However, as I said earlier, the extent of your injuries and permanent implications of the damage to your dexterity and grip strength is not something that you should ignore. You have a maximum period of 3-years from the date of your accident in which you can seek to make a claim for compensation.

          We would very much like to assist you if you do opt to make a claim and as such, I look forward to hearing from you.

          Reply
  105. jea

    I had an accident at work tripped over metal shelves left on the floor and fell backwards on to a concrete floor but have no memory of hitting the floor only seeing a co worker after the fall. I had a muscle spasm in my neck and also a deviated jaw I’m now taking medication for anxiety. Just before my accident I just finished a return to work interview with my manager where she accused me of lying and put it through unpaid . I had a phone call (after calling four times the previous week to keep them up to date on my recovery) from my line manager stating “what’s going on” if she didn’t hear from me it would be unpaid. I didn’t call that morning as I wasn’t sleeping well through the night and was later to rise. I felt anxious and tried returning to work but once there felt light headed and anxious so my doctor gave me a further line for 1 week I then thought about returning to work but was anxious and upset about returning after being accused of lying by my manager at my previous return to work so I felt the issued needed to be addressed and phoned to sort things out internally and spoke to the senior manager who asked me “why had it taken three weeks out of the blue to come up with this? I explained that the reason I hadn’t mentioned it before was because it happened just before my accident ( she was aware off my accident) also said “I would not dictate who done my return to work but to come back and discuss the matter with her, I felt she was hostile towards me and felt stressed and anxious went to the doctor and he has put me on medication to deal with anxious .

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      It certainly sounds as if your employer has treated you unkindly and applied unfair pressure on you with regards to your absences from work.

      With regards to the accident you mention where you tripped over metal shelving units that had been left on the floor of your workplace, we feel that you have justifiable grounds to pursue a claim on the grounds of employer negligence. Employers and workers have a strong duty of care to ensure that any workplace is safe and that any risk of injury is reduced as far as possible and that where risks of injury remain present, that adequate hazard warnings are erected.

      In your case, I can see a legitimate argument in your favour against the employer that the shelves were left on the floor of the workplace and were not cordoned off of marked with any hazard notices.

      Given the attitude that your employer has shown towards you, I would imagine that you do not hold them in the highest esteem. With that in mind, you may wish to further pursue a claim for compensation for the injuries you sustained to your neck and jaw in this fall at work. We would be happy to investigate your options for you and look to see if we can help get your claim up and running.

      Reply
  106. lynne

    I had an accident at a training venue 150 miles from my place of work. I did not take a picture of the broken path and Im now back at my normal place of work.

    Can I get employees there to take pictures of the accident site? Or are they not obliged too?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You should definitely ask someone to obtain photographs for you. There is no reason for them not to do so.

      Any photographs showing a tripping hazard or defect in a footpath should ideally include visible measurements to reflect on the size of the hole or height of the tripping hazard that caused the accident. As such, it would be helpful if your colleagues could take a clearly marked ruler/measure with them to hold against the edge of any hole or side of any tripping hazard. If they do not have anything suitable available, placing a 50p piece against the edge/side of any hazard is the next best thing.

      I would suggest that you direct any colleague you ask to get photographs for you to our helpful tips and examples of how to present photographs showing clear measurements for use in a claim for tripping accident compensation.

      Reply
  107. James

    I had an accident at work and needed to go a&e but they sent me on my own, should i have been accompanied by someone?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is no requirement for an employer to accompany an injured worker to Hospital, but you would expect a caring employer to want to make sure that their injured worker is ok and to make sure that they have arrived at Hospital safely.

      Reply
  108. L.Rodgers

    My husband had a fall at work breaking 2 ribs and his wrist. His company have accepted liability. What information on my caring of him do they need?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employers will only need information on what care YOU have provided for your Husband if you are claiming costs for this by way of a claim for personal injury compensation after an accident at work. In such cases and in any claim for personal injury compensation, you can claim special damages as well as compensation for the pain and discomfort of the injury itself. In a special damages claim, you can claim costs for care/support given by a loved one (usually a spouse) or friends who have provided time to help an injured person during their recovery when they cannot work or live as normal. Things that can be included would be days taken off work by a partner to provide care or for time taken off work to drive someone to and from Hospital appointments etc.

      Reply
  109. Janice

    Hi i am an employer, I have a worker that works from an office above a pub, he needs to climb a staircase. He often is there on his own and he walks with a frame. I have often seen him coming down the stairs on his bum. I am concerned he will have an accident, am I able to ask him to sign a disclaimer that acknowledges his awareness of the risks and therefore will not bring a claim if he does fall?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Janice

      If the staircase that your employee has to climb is free of hazards and in full and well maintained repair, you probably have nothing to worry about.

      However, as you have noticed that he has mobility issues and you have concerns about his safety in using the stair case, you would be wise to have a minuted meeting with the employee where you raise your concerns and ask them further about their ability to use the stairs safely. From there, you have 2 choices, either allow him to continue using the stairs or prohibit this and either find him an alternative workstation where stairs are not required or terminate his employment.

      It is hard for me to advise on this, but I would strongly suggest that you speak with your employer liability insurers to discuss this issue and get their advice.

      Yours sincerely

      Ian

      Reply
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