Can I claim for loss of earnings after an injury?

47 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

Accidents can turn your life upside-down. Whether you work full-time, part-time or on a self-employed basis, the professional impact can be huge. Being forced to take time off can be a strain not just mentally and physically, but financially too.

If you’ve been injured in an accident that wasn’t your fault, and you’ve lost income because of it, there’s a strong chance you can claim for loss of earnings. This applies regardless of whether the accident occurred in your workplace.

Table of contents

Claiming for loss of earnings

Injuries come in various forms – as do valid claims. It might be that an accident has stopped you from working for a few days or weeks. Alternatively, your situation might be serious enough to prevent you from doing your job for months, years, or even indefinitely.

Whatever your circumstances, and whatever type of injury you’ve suffered, a loss of earnings claim requires evidence. The accident and injury need proof of their own, of course, – we’ll touch on this a little further down – but you’ll also need to verify the earnings you’ve lost.

What sort of evidence do I need to provide?

If you’re employed (rather than self-employed), the simplest way of proving how much income you’ve lost is through your most recent payslips. In many cases, payslips for the three months, or 13 weeks, prior to the accident will be enough, but you may need more. Bank statements can be used if necessary.

In straightforward cases, it’s then a case of calculating how long you’ve been unable to work and how much take-home pay you’ve missed out on. Be aware that the sum you’ll be due will reflect your net monthly pay – in other words, the income you normally receive after tax and national insurance contributions.

Issues such as overtime, bonuses, holiday allowances, pension payments and other perks can all be considered too, so long as you can prove you would otherwise have benefited from them. Where things like overtime are concerned, payslips of colleagues can provide useful evidence to back up your case.

If relevant, you may even be able to claim for loss of a potential promotion.

And don’t worry if you work erratic hours or have a variable wage from month to month. It’s often possible to look at previous payslips to come up with a figure that represents your average income.

What if I’m self-employed?

We deal with this question a lot. Although the claims tend to be slightly more complicated, you’re very much still entitled to claim for loss of earnings if you’re self-employed.

You’ll need to provide the last three years’ worth of your verified business accounts (or as close to three years as possible) to show your average earnings. This helps to work out the loss of profit caused by your accident.

Where feasible you should also show evidence of work projects that were in the calendar before the injury, but which became impossible to fulfil. Evidence of this kind might take the form of written instructions from a client, a pre-agreed contract that’s now been lost, or even a dated email exchange.

It’s also helpful to keep a careful record of the days you were (or still are) unable to work, as well as a detailed overview of your financial accounts.

What about future loss of earnings?

Happily, most loss of earnings claims are fairly small. But if you’ve been unlucky enough to suffer a serious accident, your claim might be far more significant. And if your capacity to work is still severely reduced, affecting your long-term prospects, the losses you’re suffering may well be substantial.

In this case, your claim could also include the loss of future earnings. This may also apply if you’ve returned to work, only to find that your injuries have forced you to stop again.

If you’re nearing retirement age, or have been involved in an extremely bad accident, it might be genuinely impossible for you to return to work at all. In this instance, your total losses could include your expected earnings up until the time you were likely to retire.

Most cases of this kind would use the standard retirement age, unless there was strong proof that you were due to carry on working beyond this time. Evidence such as a formal arrangement with your employer would be valuable here.

Self-employed workers can also potentially claim loss of earnings beyond retirement age – but again, a solid argument would be needed to support the case.

What if I’m struggling to pay the bills in the meantime?

If you’ve been forced to stop work for an extensive period, it can be possible to arrange for an interim payment from the insurers of the third party, if that party has admitted liability. In effect, it’s a way of receiving part of your compensation before a final decision has been made.

You’re also entitled to claim state benefits, although be aware that these payments would generally be deducted from any compensation you’re due for loss of earnings.

What about other losses I’ve incurred?

A personal injury claim normally has two parts: general damages and special damages.

General damages cover the pain, suffering and loss of quality of life that you’ve had to deal with, as a result of your injury.

Special damages cover loss of earnings, as well as material expenses such as medical and physio treatment, transport costs to appointments and prescription charges. Other recoverable expenses that fall into this category could include unused gym memberships, missed cultural or sporting events (assuming tickets had already been purchased), and even clothing and personal effects damaged in the accident.

If you’ve had to employ tradespeople to take on tasks around the house that you would otherwise have done yourself, it may also be possible to add these expenses to a claim. Ensure you keep all receipts.

How long will a claim take?

The process of claiming can take several months, so it’s always advisable to get in touch early.

Personal injury claims like this can sometimes seem complicated, but in many cases they’re more straightforward than you’d think. We’ll always advise you on the best course of action for your individual circumstances, to ensure you don’t miss out on the compensation you’re entitled to.

Any other questions? Feel free to ask one below or get in touch for a no-obligation consultation.

47 questions have been answered below, why not ask your own?

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Questions & Answers


  1. Mohammed

    Can you still claim a loss of earning if you have a second job?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If someone is unable to work due to an injury caused by someone else or due to the negligence of a 3rd party, the injured person can make a claim for personal injury compensation. The claimant can recover compensation for their injuries and also recover any loss of income or out of pocket expenses related to the injuries caused in the index incident at the head of their claim. If a claimant had 2 jobs, but can work neither, so long as they can demonstrate that they would have continued to earn the incomes in normal circumstances (if they had not been injured), the can recover the loss of income incurred whether that be from 1 job, or 2.

      Reply
  2. Victoria

    I had an accident at work in sept 2019 where I was lone working in a hotel, I had to go into the kitchen but there was a delay in the automatic lights switching on and I slipped on a leaking oil trap, badly injuring my back. I did not go back to work due to the pain and inability to walk straight, lift or drive. In February 2020 due to a break down in communication from my employer – they stopped replying to my emails and would not answer my calls – I felt so uncomfortable about my employer that I resigned. I have recently received an assessment from a back surgeon who told me it will take around 18 months from the date of the accident to recover enough to be able to return to employment. Can I claim compensation for loss of earnings for the whole 18 months or just Sept 2019-Feb 2020? If the accident had not occurred I would happily have stayed in employment with the company.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether or not you can claim loss of income for the whole period is unlikely as you have chosen to resign – whilst you may well have had legitimate reasons for doing so, the employers insurers will likely argue that you have partially caused your own loss of income. That said, our specialist Solicitors will always attempt to maximise a claimants settlement in terms of legitimate entitlement.

      However, you can make a claim for the injury and the long term problems caused to you as a result of slipping on the oil leak. If you would like our help in making your claim for compensation, please call us on 01225430285 or ask us to call you if you prefer.

      Reply
  3. Sohail Asif

    I spoke to you last time about my loss of earnings being around 9k and my case going to court because the third party are not agreeing to pay although liability has been admitted. My case was originally scheduled for 28/08/2020 but was adjourned due to the court not expecting our case hearing for that day. It is now being rescheduled. My solicitor is now advising me that in the medical loss of earnings is not mentioned and due to that it may not be recoverable. However I have GP sick notes from the date of my accident til the time I was off work. What is your view of this? Should my loss of earnings still be recoverable?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      As long as you can demonstrate your usual earnings (providing payslips/bank statements) and the loss of income in the period where you cannot work, your Solicitor should be able to recover any qualifying loss of income.

      Reply
  4. Vasi Jassoo

    I work in Sainsbury warehouse. I was using a forklift to lift a pallet. The pallet was not organised properly as the toilet roll was placed at bottom and drinks were on top. It fell on my thigh and caused my ankle to twist. I have been off work for two week. I am getting one third of my salary while I am off from work. I had online physio consultation from the insurance company. Do you think I am eligible to claim full salary since the accident happened at work ? This incident happened before but no one was hurt.
    Please advise?

    Thank you

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      My initial view is that you should make a claim for personal injury compensation to recover your lost income and also compensation for the injury caused to you. The loading of the pallet that you describe indicates that there was negligence in this matter and as the incident had happened previously (albeit without injury), the employer should have ensure that this didn’t happen again.

      We can help you make a claim for personal injury compensation on a No Win No Fee basis and doing so does not affect your employment rights in anyway. Please call our team on 01225430285 or if you prefer, you can either ask us to call you or make further contact with us by email to: justice@direct2compensation.co.uk

      Reply
  5. Michelle

    I have a Car accident claim going on and i have been advised to accept an offer, in the loss of earnings section it states an amount and says next to it to be paid to me and my employer? does this mean this amount is split equally between us both i am a bit confused to this part

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If an employer has incurred costs as a result of the negligence that caused your injuries, in theory they can recover their loss in your claim also. However, they cannot recover monies due to you.

      As an example, if your employer paid you in full whilst you were off work and your Solicitor was able to recover that pay, that would be money for your employer and not you – as you cannot expect to be paid twice.

      Reply
  6. James

    I suffered a back injury at work and the consultant I saw has said the injury will prevent me working for 2 years. I tried to claim for loss of earnings but according to the lawyer I spoke to, i cannot due to receiving full sick pay I didn’t have any loss of earnings. HOWEVER….the consultant meeting happened and then 2 months later I was retired from my job and have been unemployed since. So am I right in thinking I should be able to claim loss of earnings since then? i assume the company I spoke to didnt realise I was retired shortly afterwards and assumed I was still employed.
    A reply would be fantastic thank you

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      If you were left unable to work as a result of your injuries and lost your job as a result, you should be able to recover loss of income for the period in which you cannot work.

      Reply
  7. Julie

    On 9th January My husband put a formal grievance in against his line manager. The same day he went off sick from work due to the stress. He received a letter from a senior manager confirming receipt of the grievance on 12th January and asking if he wishes to proceed. My husband replied yes and he would like to be contacted via email or phone. The company have not done anything about the grievance to date nor contacted my husband. They have sent a letter stating that his company sick pay has now ended (3 weeks) and that he will now be receiving ssp. This is the only communication received from the company. Where does he go from here? Can he claim loss of wages as he cannot go back to work until the issue is resolved. And due to their lack of reasonable timescale of dealing with the grievance. He has no wages

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      He cannot claim loss of wages as things stand because nothing has been proven in terms of employer negligence. Should he wish to discuss a potential claim for work related stress compensation, your Husband should complete and return our initial questionnaire on this claim type. Our specialist can then review this for him and advise as to whether or not a No Win No Fee claim against his employer could follow.

      Reply
  8. Patrick

    My wife works as a school taxi driver. She had an accident Thursday 21/11 in the car with minimal damage to the car. Her employer isn’t claiming via their insurance and is paying to repair the car. She has sustained a neck/back injury and been seen by the doctor. She hasn’t completed any paperwork for her company and hasn’t been told if she needs to or not.
    What can she do if she has to have time off as it hurts to drive?
    Is she entitled to be paid, sick pay etc?
    Does she need to insist on completing an accident at work form?
    Could she claim via their car insurance for loss of earnings if she has to take time off?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your wife’s employers should certainly have completed an accident report form, noting the details of the incident and any injuries sustained. Should your wife remain in a state of pain and discomfort to the point where she has to take leave from work and does not receive pay, her only route to recover loss of income would be by making a claim for personal injury compensation against the insurance of the vehicle in which she was injured (providing she was the non-fault party) or from her employers employer liability insurance cover.

      There is no legal requirement to pay sick pay if an employee is off work through injury or illness – even if the injury or illness was caused whilst at work. Whether or not your wife would receive sick pay will depend on her contractual rights. Otherwise, she will receive SSP – if she is entitled to it.

      If your wife’s employers won’t allow her to complete an incident report, she should email her line manager regarding their refusal and make her own report in that correspondence.

      We would be happy to assist with any claim should she opt to pursue such action. Your wife can call us for help on 01225430285 or use our ‘start a claim‘ service to make further contact.

      Reply
  9. Amedeo

    Hi, I ruptured a ligament in my knee at work clearing up materials and resulted in having 3 weeks off. I didn’t report it in accident book because I put up with the pain for a few days at work thinking it would just go away. The pain got so severe I saw a docter, got an mri. I have doctors notes and mri results. Can I claim loss of earnings for the 3 weeks ? Thanks

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Under UK law, the only way you could make a claim for loss of income would be by making a claim for personal injury compensation against your employers ’employer liability insurance’ cover and succeeding with the same.

      In this case, a claim would succeed if the injury to your knee can be directly attributed to employer negligence. Therefore, if you have not received adequate training by your employer or you were not provided with the right equipment or personal protective equipment (PPE) you may well be able to succeed with a claim and should contact us to take this further.

      Reply
  10. tony

    I have had an injury at work. In mid February I had my right hand crushed. I have had 2 operations and due a 3rd operation on the 3rd of June. My earnings immediately went to half and now this morning been told is now dropped significantly to a quarter of my usual earnings a month. I am frustrated to be in this situation and now I am fretting and worrying like I have never because of this hammer blow

    I live by myself so bills will be due very soon and I am going to be cornered because of the financial situation this will cause. I am considering selling things to help with some cash flow just to get some food in and help with the travel costs to Norwich hospital (that I have been making nearly every week) to have my injury assessed. Not sure what you think or can do in my situation, I am starting to feel trapped and anxious on top of my injury.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Your loss of income caused by your nasty injury at work is something that can be resolved in the long term, by making a claim for compensation. If you were to succeed with a claim, you would be well compensated for the nasty hand injury and for the future impact that this will have on you, as well as recovering any lost income or incurred costs.

      Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Coping with a loss of wages after an accident work is a very common stress that our claimants discuss with us. Sadly, there is no obligation on employers to pay staff their salary whilst they are off work due to injury or illness – even if that was caused in an accident at work. That you have received half pay and now quarter pay clearly shows that you are losing income.

      Your rights in this regard are to make a claim for compensation for the injury you sustained at work. Whether or not you have a valid claim is not something I can say for certain at this stage because I don’t know how or why your hand was crushed. However, you clearly have a very serious injury given that you’ve already had 2 surgeries and await a 3rd.

      We would very much like to speak with you to find out more about your work and your accident so that we can advise you and if appropriate, place your claim with our specialist Solicitors in order that they can pursue your claim for compensation and also recover any lost income caused by this accident.

      Reply
  11. william

    I had a slip on new flooring at work back in October 2018. As a result of this I injured my back causing me to have several weeks of work. I visited my doctor who advised me to take time off to recover and also went in to see our occupational health nurse at work after a request from our HR department, who also said I should take a further 3 weeks off for time to recover from my injury, and that he would inform the company of his decision. During my time off I also came in to see the works physio twice who on first visit wouldn’t do anything as at that time I was waiting to have an x-ray on my back and second time did nothing because he said he didn’t have time. I visited our occupational health nurse again after returning to work earlier than expected as I didn’t renew my absence from work note from my doctor as i felt better at that time, our occupation nurse put me on reduced hours and stated that he would Email managers and state that i should only do light duties also for this period. From the moment i returned to work i was back on normal duties as if nothing had happened, this caused a lot of discomfort and pain during work hours for another few weeks, through all this i was only paid sick pay for the time i was off and did not receive full pay after an accident at work, I was told by our senior HR representative that i only received sick pay because i brought in a sick note from my doctor, after i explained that i was off after an accident at work and not off sick he just stated… but you brought in a sick note!! There was 2 witnesses that heard me fall and saw me get up and also another colleague that had slipped on the same floor but didn’t report it. Many have said that I could put in a claim for loss of earnings, damages etc. I would just be happy with getting back loss of earnings from this if possible, after all.. if I hadn’t slipped at work causing the damage in the first place i would of been at work and not lost any pay. Is there anything I can do?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Whether you are off work through an injury or illness caused at work or due to any other reason is irrelevant in UK law. Employers are not required to pay usual salaries to any employees who are off work through injury or illness – unless they opt to include such benefits within their contract of employment. Unsurprisingly, most employers in the UK opt against providing full salary during ill health and as a result, for people who are injured in an accident at work it is common for a loss of income during the period of absence from work. Indeed, the only route most UK workers have to recover lost income after an accident at work is through claiming compensation. However, to recover lost income one must succeed with a claim for accident at work compensation.

      In your case, you may have a valid claim against the employer if it can be demonstrated that the cause of your injury was negligence. You mention that you slipped on a new floor surface. What caused you to slip? If you are of the view that the floor was excessively slippery and dangerous, we would need to show that the employer either knew of this slipping risk and failed to act upon it by providing warning signs or safety matting or that they failed to assess the risk. Do you know if anyone else had slipped on this floor? Do you know if the employer has done anything since your fall to try to make sure that this won’t happen to anyone else?

      Reply
  12. Gill

    I am out of work for the last 6 months with work related stress, can I claim my lost of earnings from my company?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Work related stress claims are notoriously difficult to pursue successfully. Indeed, to succeed it is vital that the employers were aware of genuine stress and concern BEFORE any period of serious absence began. If the employer was not on notice of your situation before it became chronic, they are likely to avoid any liability as they would simply say that they did not know that there had been any issue and that they’d had no opportunity to resolve it.

      Reply
  13. belinda

    i had a fall at work preforming an emergency moving and handling procedure to save a residents life. i have been left unable to work due to my injuries i have soft tissue damage and a fracture to my left hand and an injury to my pelvis tissue and muscular damage. off work between 3/6 months only receiving ssp. my employers have offered that i use next years holiday entitlement and also a loan to which i could pay back.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The employer is free to make such an offer to you and you are free to accept that, if you felt it acceptable. However, is next years holiday entitlement as a financial value going to really ease your situation? Given the severity of your injuries and the lengthy enforced loss of income caused by your accident at work, wouldn’t your interests would be better if you could recover your lost income? Have you considered making a claim for compensation?

      The option to take action to seek compensation for injuries sustained in an accident work on a No Win No Fee basis is in place for people in the exact situation in which you find yourself. If you believe that your accident (and therefore injuries) was avoidable if some further items had been put in place by the employer. For example, if you were not adequately trained to do the work you were tasked with doing or left understaffed and without important provisions and equipment, you may be able to demonstrate employer negligence and make a legitimate claim for accident at work compensation.
      If successful with a claim in your situation, you could recover substantial damages for the injuries you have sustained and also recover any and all lost income caused by the accident. Of course, to be successful, an employer will have to admit to negligence and admit liability.

      I would be very happy to chat with you about your accident and help evaluate as to whether or not you can pursue a claim for accident at work compensation. If you would like some further help, please email your contact number to me: ian@direct2compensation.co.uk

      Reply
  14. Nick warren

    I had an accident at work where I crushed my right index finger which was treated with an operation to put a screw in the finger, the bone would not heal so last week I had to have the tip of my finger amputated. I am unable to do my job but have been told I can only get ssp which is not covering my bills. Is there anything that I can do.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You can pursue a claim for compensation after the injuries you have sustained in this accident at work. If the cause of the injury can be attributed to a lack of employer training, or employer negligence – such as a failure to provide the correct safety protections you would be able to claim compensation for the damage to and loss of the top of your finger as well as recover all lost income caused.

      Injuries to the fingers can lead to substantial settlements in claims for personal injury compensation. As you have lost part of the finger, you have lost part of your dexterity and grip strength. As such, a permanent injury and one that will impact your day-to-day ability and is likely to affect you at work. Therefore, it is important that you are provided with expert specialist legal representation – something you can be sure of with Direct2Compensation.

      Reply
    • Casey

      Hi, can my company claim off me a month after an accident I had which was my fault but that is not involving another vehicle just damage to the van? There is nothing about the van or motor insurance in my contract. This has come from HR also.

      Reply
      • Ian Morris

        If you were driving legally, with insurance in a company vehicle, the company vehicle insurance would be responsible for any damage to the vehicle.

        Reply
  15. Ashley

    Hi I have been dealing with mental health problems and recently at work I was threatened with violence, on more than one occasion I reported to my boss who ignored the situation after a few times of this happening. I made a formal complaint about the boss and the person involved with making the threats, due to stress I was signed of work and put on statutory sick pay, can I claim back my wage due to this being out of my control?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      The scenario you describe does not fit the criteria for a personal injury compensation claim. However, you may well be able to take some action if employment law has been breached. As such, we would strongly advise that you make contact with a specialist in employment law to discuss this matter.

      Reply
  16. Marius

    Hi,
    I have currently a claim for loss of past and future earnings against a big chemical company after developing an allergy at work due to their negligence.
    My solicitor calculated my past and future loss of earnings, but I’m not happy with this as he said if at one point in the past if I got to earn more then at the chemical company there is not anymore a case of loss future earnings. I’ve explain him that indeed I’ve earned more for a certain period of time but is not the case anymore. from 5 months ago my wages are again low.
    can I claim for future loss of earnings in this case?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Without having full sight of the information it is clearly not possible for us to provide a qualified view. However, if the health problems you have sustained in your previous work have lead to a loss of income in the past and future, you should be able to recover the difference between your current/future income and what you had expected to receive.

      Reply
  17. Michael Burton

    Last year whilst working on a machine for maintenance it toppled over. I instinctively reached out to stop and resulted in a partial rupture of my left Bicep, due to the injury I was off work for four months receiving only SSP the loss of earnings meant spending all our savings on Mortgage repayments and household bills. Would I have a case to reclaim my lost earnings?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      You could recover your lost income and costs incurred, but only if you are able to succeed with a claim for workplace injury compensation. To succeed with such a claim, you would have to demonstrate that the cause of the injury (and therefore the cause of your losses) was down to negligence from your employer or someone else. For example, if you were not adequately or correctly trained to use the machine you were working or if the machine toppled because of a defect in the ground, or a hazard that should not have been present.

      Reply
  18. Nicola Pitchford

    Can you claim for loss of earnings after leaving your job that you had previously injured yourself at. Resulting in needed an operation to fix and being signed off sick for 3 months?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      When any person succeeds with a personal injury compensation claim, they can seek to recover a settlement for their injuries and also a separate claim for loss of income and expenses – known as special damages.

      Whether or not you will be able to hold the employer liable for your future loss of earnings in your situation is impossible for us to tell at this stage. Have you already started a claim for the injuries you mention? If so, you should discuss your loss of income with your Solicitor. If not, we can get our specialist Solicitors to look in to this for you.

      Reply
  19. MATT Hackworth

    I was injured at work and also lost earnings. I was advised by many staff to claim for loss of six months of earnings after I had resigned.

    Now I am wishing to go back and work at the same place. However, I wonder if the fact that I had claimed for loss of earnings, can they make it difficult for me not to be employed by them?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      There is no legal or legitimate reason that the employer could use to treat you unfairly or discriminate against you at work, simply because you exercised your legal right to make a claim for compensation after being injured at work.

      Reply
  20. Frazer Rodriguez

    Can I get Physiotherapy as part of my settlement?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Hi, great question! Yes, in many cases if you are still suffering from the symptoms of your injury whilst going through the claims process, your Solicitor is able to try and seek rehabilitation therapy for you at the expense of the 3rd party defending the claim. Any such rehab treatment will only be available when an admission of liability has been obtained.

      What you can do is seek the treatments you need now – such as physiotherapy, osteotherapy, massage therapy etc etc and get yourself the help you need. Although you’ll have to pay the cost at this stage, retain receipts and you can then look to reclaim any such costs through your special damages claim.

      I hope this helps.

      Reply
  21. lynn

    I have had a fall at work and I am wondering where I stand. I work for a agency and went to my work place, it had been snowing and was extremely icy. I slipped on the ice due to it not been gritted at all. I attend hospital and have to rest my arm for 5 days, it’s in a sling, when management was asked why it hadn’t been gritted the answer was to save money. I will need a few days off work and won’t be getting paid, can I claim loss of earnings?

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Lynn

      I am sorry to hear about your injury. Having spoken to many people in your situation over the years, we understand that the pain and discomfort of an injury like yours is made all the worse when it transpires that you will also be out of pocket due to lost income.

      Claiming compensation after slipping on ice or snow is not always a straight forward process because ice and snow is known to be slippery. However, when it happens in the workplace it can often be an easier process. The fact that your employers (even though you are working via an agency) have decided to save a few pounds by not spending money on gritting or salting the area could make them liable for your injuries.

      We would definitely be happy to help you try to make a claim for injury compensation against the business where you were working. As with all accidents at work, it is important to ensure that you have reported the details of your accident to both the business where you are working and the agency who have placed you there.

      Reply
  22. daniel smit

    Whilst loading beds on to a transit van the portable ramp slipped from the top step to the second step which resulted in a hernia developing. i am currently out for 4 weeks whilst awaiting surgery and then off for an undisclosed length of time for recovery. Due to the nature of my work, i am not able to return to work for light duties. i have been told i will be paid ssp but this doesn’t even cover the rent, let alone other bills….

    I only want my loss of wages covered, so i don’t get into debt.

    Reply
    • Ian Morris

      Daniel

      I am sorry to hear about your situation. Sadly, having to cope with the stress a temporary loss of income is a common thread we hear from people who, like you, contact us after an accident at work.

      You could certainly make a claim for accident at work compensation – this would be against your employers insurance (employers liability insurance). Any claim (if successful) would enable you to claim a level of compensation to cover the pain and distress caused by your injury, but more importantly allow you to reclaim any lost income. You should certainly note any loss of income and keep a record as this would be used in your claim to enable you to claim special damages (lost income and costs).

      It is important to make sure that the details of your accident and the cause of your injuries (the faulty ramp) within your employers accident book. If this has not already been done, you should contact your employers at the earliest opportunity to report your accident correctly. A good way of doing so is to email them outlining the details of your situation. You can then keep a copy of your record in your ‘sent emails’ folder for future reference – this could be very helpful to any future claim for compensation.

      We would certainly be keen to assist you with a claim and can link you up with the right specialist injury compensation solicitor. May I direct you to follow this link: where you can submit a claim enquiry with more information so that we can contact you to help you get your claim up and running.

      Reply
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